Dismissing those on the “wrong side of history” is a leftist propaganda bluff

Dismissing those on the “wrong side of history” is a leftist propaganda bluff. By the Z-Man.

Marx was a mediocre intellectual, but he cast a huge shadow. There were many smart men working the communist and socialist circuits in the 19th century, many smarter and more reasonable than Marx, but it was Marx who towered over the rest. …

One reason Marx rose above the rest was that he provided intellectual authority to the socialist movement.

His theory of history turned a collection of moral preferences into scientific fact, which gave the believers an unquestionable authority upon which to base their economic and political claims. To this day we hear people on the so-called Left claim that they are on the right side of history. This means their opponents are on the wrong side of history, so they can be dismissed. …

So who was on the wrong side of history? When has Marxism ever been anything but a disaster?

The people who rallied to Marxism were not the urban proletariat, but the urban bourgeois intellectuals. …

Ideas have consequences and bad ideas have bad consequences. That should be the lesson of Marxism.

Not exactly news, but nicely said. Karl himself was a complete ruin of a man:

Throughout the 1840s, Marx found himself a man without a country. He was run out of Prussia in 1842, expelled from France in 1845, rejected from Belgium in 1848, and was forced to leave Prussia — once again — in 1848. He then moved to England in 1849, but Britain denied him citizenship and Prussia refused to re-naturalize him. Marx even considered moving to the Republic of Texas in 1843 …

From the time he moved to England in early 1849 until the time of his death, Marx and his family lived in abject poverty. Within a year of arriving in London, he was kicked out of his two-room apartment for failing to pay rent. For decades after he was forced to use a fake name to hide from creditors.

On some days, Marx could not even leave his house because his wife Jenny had to pawn his pants to buy food. His friend and collaborator, Friedrich Engels, frequently sent Marx money (between 1865 and 1869 alone Engels gave Marx the equivalent of $36,000). …

When he died he was broke and his influence was waning — only 11 people attended his funeral on March 17, 1883 …

A guy whose family had only one pair of pants — so they could not all leave the house at once — purports to know how to run modern economies. The cheek.