Northern Territory Supreme Court judge criticizes ideology of ‘supposed anti-racism’ for hiding horrific aboriginal domestic violence

Northern Territory Supreme Court judge criticizes ideology of ‘supposed anti-racism’ for hiding horrific aboriginal domestic violence. By Matt Cunningham.

“I say an ideology of ‘supposed anti-racism’ because the underlying assumption of this ideology appears to be that Aboriginal people must exist in a permanent state of victimhood, an assumption that is in fact deeply racist,” Justice Judith Kelly said in an address to a group of women lawyers in Darwin on August 26.

“Further, among those in thrall to this ideology, labelling someone or something ‘racist’ seems in many cases to be an end in itself — not a prelude to remedial action, but a substitute for it.”

Justice Kelly questioned why the media paid so much attention to Indigenous incarceration rates, but so little to Aboriginal women who were the victims of abuse.

“Everyone is willing to talk about the over-representation of Aboriginal men in prison,” she said. “It has been called Australia’s shame and so it is. …

The stream of Aboriginal men going to prison is matched by a steady stream — a river — of Aboriginal women going to the hospital and to the morgue.

“It is an epidemic of extreme domestic violence, and I’m certainly not the only one to point it out.

“Between 2000 and 2022, two Aboriginal men were shot by police both times followed by massive press coverage, calls for enquiries etc.

“In that same period, 65 Aboriginal women were killed by their partners (I am quoting from Libby Armitage’s report in a recent coronial inquiry) and in each case you would have been flat out seeing a small report on page 5 or 7 of a local newspaper — nothing nationally.

“Indigenous women are approximately 10 times more likely to be the victim of an assault than non-indigenous women, and 32 times more likely to end up in hospital than a non-indigenous woman victim.”

The ruling class explanations for the crime and domestic violence are so unconvincing.

On the other hand, match the characteristics of the aboriginal populations where these problems are occurring with other Australians, and compare the rates. Then we might be working towards truths and solutions.

More here, by Jacinta Price.

hat-tip Stephen Neil