Italy: The Rise of Meloni

Italy: The Rise of Meloni. By Mark Gullick.

A general election this coming Sept. 25. …

Giorgia Meloni is potentially the first-ever female prime minister of a notoriously macho country, and so she should be a bright star. The problem is that she is right-wing, and that trumps her gender. In fact, not only is Meloni right-wing, but at age 15 she joined the Youth Front of Movimento Sociale Italiano, a party formed in 1946 by supporters of another Italian politician, name of Benito something. Mussolini, that was it. So, yes. You might call Signora Meloni a lady of a conservative cast. …

With her party topping the polls for months, Meloni understands that ordinary people are getting wise to, and tired of, the tendency of coalition politicians to sway with the breeze and so produce weather-vane politics. She has a stable vision based around nationalism and Christian values, although political enemies note that she is not married to the father of her child. Oh, please. This is Italy.

Meloni is also vocally opposed to abortion, mass immigration, gay marriage, and LGBT teaching, stating publicly that trans people are used as ideological “human shields” in the culture war. Oh, and she believes the great replacement to be what young people call “a thing.” If that’s not enough, what will be sending a chill wind through the Brussels chambers is Meloni’s deep suspicion of and opposition to the E.U. superstate, preferring to talk at most of a confederation of sovereign nations. …

Meloni’s party is named Fratelli d’Italia, which not only means “Brothers of Italy” but is also the first line of the Italian national anthem. Now, that’s how you do nationalism.

And Meloni is reading the room expertly. … She will be more than aware of growing Italian impatience with immigration. … Fortunately, Matteo Salvini, one of Meloni’s potential coalition partners, is respected by Italians for his forthright stance on securing the borders.

Meloni has also received the imprimatur of the grand old man of Italian politics, Silvio Berlusconi. At 85 he is the same age as the Pope and his power is waning, but symbolically he is still a sponsor of near-papal influence. …

Meloni has no doubts of her own opinion of the far left, suggesting that if in power she would use the same legislation with which Italy currently bans the fascisti to do the same to communist parties. …

Italian electioneering is being held at a time of civil action by farmers across Europe — Italy included — and Fratelli d’Italia is a party with roots in the soil rather than being metropolitan.

An Italian Trump? The only people who will stand against the globalist uniparty are those comfortable being outside the Overton window.