Covid in NSW: fourth dose enthusiasts are taking a hit

Covid in NSW: fourth dose enthusiasts are taking a hit. By David Archibald.

Our health bureaucrats have obscured the data they produce so that the hospitalization, admission to ICU, and death rates for the unvaccinated can’t be determined. But with the introduction of the fourth vaccination dose an interesting trend has been established:

 

 

The chart above shows the hospitalization rate in NSW for the vaccinated, by dose level per one million people in each dose group, from 30th April to 30th July. There hasn’t been much difference between the one, two and three dose hospitalization rates until July when the three dose people started being admitted to hospital at twice the rate of the two-dosers.

When the fourth dose was introduced a couple of months ago, they immediately started having a higher hospitalization rate than the three dose people. That has widened to the extent that they now have twice the hospitalization rate of the three dose people who in turn have twice the rate of hospitalization of that of the two dose people.

At these higher dose levels the death rate is proportional to hospitalization rate at about a quarter of those hospitalized. Some 4.3 million people in NSW have now had three and four doses. This cohort is producing 520 hospitalized from covid each week, and some 130 dead. If they had stopped at two doses, then these 4.3 million people would be producing 240-odd hospitalizations per week, and a similarly halved death rate. About 70 extra deaths are occurring weekly in NSW at the moment due to the third and fourth vaccine doses from catching covid alone.

It is clear that the covid vaccination experiment has failed.

Some of the fourth dose rate might initially have been because it was rolled out to the most at risk first. But even so, it looks pretty bad.

Our NSW authorities ought to take a holiday in Bali, where they can ask the local pharmacists how they got on top of covid. Ivermectin, cheap and effective for early treatment.