Why Everyone Hates the Educated Left

Why Everyone Hates the Educated Left. Admissions by Jeff Maurer, a leftie who has grown up enough to see the problem.

I think a good place to start is by admitting that I was, at one point in my life, more-or-less Pajama Boy. In my mid-20s, I had a graduate degree, lefty politics, and thick-rimmed glasses worn mostly for style (my eyesight is not that bad). …

Political statements can be self-righteous virtue signaling. That’s what I was doing in my 20s; I was shoe-horning political statements into places where they weren’t welcome … because “smart, political guy” was the identity I’d chosen for myself. …

I realize now how obnoxious this all was. The first problem was that it was elitist; my persona existed to remind people that I had gone to Soft-Handed Dandy University, where I majored in Fancy Lad studies. The second problem was that it was preachy …

I think most people respond to this type of performative politics with eye-rolling annoyance. That’s how I always reacted to religious fundamentalists; in high school, I knew a lot of people who would chew my ear about how evolution is a myth and being gay is a sin, blah blah blah. It was the mirror image of the performative proselytizing that I did in my 20s, presumably done for the same reasons. I remember thinking “Look, I know that the topic of evolution came up and now you need to do your little ‘intelligent design’ song and dance or else you’ll feel like a bad person, but why don’t you just leave me out of it?” A fundamentalist’s one-man holy roller show never came close to convincing me of anything, and it never made me want to join their tribe. In fact, it’s probably one of the main reasons I ended up on the left.

The nuttier the belief, the more annoying the political play-acting surrounding that belief. One of the reasons the Democratic brand is turning toxic is that parts of the left are getting into some pretty fucked-up shit — if Michael Moore was weed, then Ibram X. Kendi is heroin. … Of course, Kendi and DiAngelo are merely the king and queen of a vast empire of lefty-academic horseshit that’s convincing absolutely no-one who doesn’t already practice their religion.

He’s describing competitive virtue signaling, and how they cannot disown it because of the enforcers on the left:

It seems to me that parts of the left are caught in ideological hothouse whose temperature is rising by the minute. But I’ll be honest: I’m still sympathetic to the “it’s just a few crazies” argument. … Just as Democrats try to tie Republicans to the biggest idiots on their side, Republicans will try to tie Democrats to the biggest idiots on our side, so when they pull that move, let’s say — loudly and clearly for everyone to hear — “that crackpot doesn’t speak for us.”

We’re not doing this. How do I know? Because anyone who does do it gets labeled “heterodox”. Elite academia weirdness is playing the same role on the left that Trump plays on the right: It’s broadly unpopular but cultishly revered by the base — it’s a wedge issue. Because so much lefty weirdness is related to race and gender, liberals are afraid to denounce it, because we don’t want to get called racist or sexist. Politicians also try to say as little about it as possible, and when they do summon the nerve to denounce it, it doesn’t always work, because it’s hard to distance themselves from what’s been established as the Democratic brand. …

Critical race theory is crazy, but…

Much of the left spent the past year and a half promising a “racial reckoning”, defending actual CRT, and loudly praising cranks including but not limited to DiAngelo and Kendi. During that time, crazy things did pop up in public schools, like the training for New York Public School administrators that claimed that elements of “white-supremacy culture” include perfectionism, objectivity, and “worship of the written word”. The 1619 project developed curriculum teaching that racism was not just a large part of American history, but its defining feature. … In New York, Bill DeBlasio made a highly-publicized (and probably about to be reversed) decision to phase out the gifted and talented program in public schools because it was too Asian and too white. This, of course, is right out of the Kendi playbook: If results are inequitable, then the program is racist and must be changed. …

Too many voters didn’t trust Democrats to handle these issues. …

The woke cult is toxic:

So: Why do people hate the educated left? Some of it’s because we can be smug, smirking little Pajama Boys, and we should always try to work on that.

But I think it’s mostly because we’re seen as practitioners of — or at least sympathetic to — a weird religion that’s a borderline cult. The religion is eschatological, because it sees the world as inherently wicked and in need of a cleansing fire, and evangelical, because it demands constant proselytizing and public demonstrations of faith.

We spend a lot of time engaged in self-righteous posturing and virtue signaling, and a lot of time telling non-believers that they’re bad bad bad bad bad bad BAD!

Of course, the religion is ultimately empty — usually just an expression of guilt about one’s privilege — and requires no real sacrifice from its highly-educated, typically-wealthy practitioners.

How many people actually fit this description? I don’t know. But whatever the numbers, Democrats won’t do well if we’re seen as being captured by a cult. Wherever craziness exists, we should denounce it without reservation. We haven’t been doing that, and if we don’t start, I think there’s more electoral pain ahead.

A healthy democracy needs both sides of politics to be healthy, sensible, and not too corrupt — so you don’t mind too much if your side loses.

For the last three decades, ever since adopting identity politics and abandoning the deplorable working man, the left has steadily become crazier and crazier. The sensible left has to somehow regain control of the left from the crazy activists, for all our sakes.