National Agriculture Day celebrates the 300,000 people in our most essential industry

National Agriculture Day celebrates the 300,000 people in our most essential industry. By Gina Reinhart.

Dwight D. Eisenhower said: “Farming looks mighty easy when your plough is a pencil and you’re a thousand miles from the cornfield.”

We must help our industry survive and grow by continuing to reform the legislation that impacts Australian agriculture. Here are some ideas:

  1. To help the labour shortage … allow pensioners who want to work the ability to do so without experiencing hefty tax rates or large percentages of their pension being taken away.
  2. Greatly reduce unnecessary government tape and license fees in high cost Australia and eliminate payroll tax and stamp duty, both of which were meant to go decades ago, when state governments were supposed to live off GST and hefty mining royalties. …
  3. Allow farmers to clear their land to decrease the risk of devastating and dangerous bushfires …
  4. Implement special economic zones across the north of Australia, with less government tape and taxes. …
  5. Recognise that for the agricultural industry, water is king. Let farmers build dams, plus where the country is suitable, build hydroelectricity projects, enabling more water for agriculture – water that otherwise flows uselessly to the sea. …
  6. Make the changes necessary to protect our beef and lamb from having its reputation for safe, wholesome, nutritious food, without chemicals, tarnished by some of the fake-meat manufacturers …
  7. Compensate farmers for the loss of property rights that occurred when the Howard government incentivised the states to introduce tree clearing bans, solely for the purpose of meeting the Kyoto targets.

I have struggled to find positive messages to include, but feel I’d be failing as patron, if I didn’t speak frankly, with concerns about the future of our essential industry, an industry iconic to our country, our culture and our history.

Agriculture is so easily taken for granted by the bureaucrats in the big cities — who get in the way of agriculture in so many ways, often out of sheer ignorance and thoughtlessness.