Stark reality of a two-tiered Australian society sinks in

Stark reality of a two-tiered Australian society sinks in. By Cameron Stewart.

Anti-vaxxers are being targeted by employers almost every day as a growing number of companies and organisations require their staff to be vaccinated to work. …

Pubs, restaurants and hospitality venues in NSW and Victoria also are preparing to lock out unvaccinated customers as those states close in on the national road map reopening targets of a 70 per cent and 80 per cent double-vaxxed population.

So far, the public and political mood in Australia is firmly weighted in favour of rewarding the vaccinated at the expense of those who are unvaccinated by choice.

The unvaccinated can protest:

But as the protests and the attacks on several Covid-19 vaccination hubs in Melbourne showed this week, many of the one in 10 Australians who say they will not get vaccinated do not intend to accept this two-tier society quietly. …

The Victorian government’s blanket edict for Covid-19 vaccinations for construction industry workers was always risky given that surveys show construction has the highest vaccination hesitancy rate of any industry at 35 per cent. …

By contrast, the NSW government chose not to mandate jabs for all construction workers but instead restricted work sites with an unvaccinated worker to 50 per cent capacity.

The unvaccinated become second-class citizens:

NSW will become the first example of this two-tier society from October 11 when the state is set to hit the initial 70 per cent target. From that day the vaccinated majority will be able to visit family and friends, dine out, drink in a pub, go to a hairdresser, and attend theatre and sporting events, although with limited numbers. The unvaccinated will receive none of these freedoms. …

Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews says the road map for his state’s path out of lockdown also will be heavily weighted towards rewarding the vaccinated, leaving anti-vaxxers out in the cold. …

The NSW premier seems to be laboring under the illusion that vaccination will lead to herd immunity. As if. Under current technology, circulating covid means everyone gets it. The question is, when you get it are you vaccinated, ivermectined, in good shape with lots of vitamin D and zinc, or not?

NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian says that even after her state passes the 80 per cent vaccination mark, anti-vaxxers cannot “let everybody else do the hard work and then turn up” for equal freedoms. …

The public mainly support the two tiers. Though that may be because they have been misinformed, and offered only the false choice of “vaccinate or nothing” rather than the outlawed choice of “vaccinate or ivermectin”:

Both Berejiklian and Andrews appear to have strong public support for rewarding the vaccinated at the expense of anti-vaxxers. Most people in Sydney and Melbourne are exhausted by their indefinite lockdowns and have little sympathy for those who remain unvaccinated by choice, especially if they delay their path to regaining freedoms.

A recent survey by YouGov found that two in three Australians support a so-called vaccine passport that people must produce to gain entry to sport venues, cinemas, nightclubs and restaurants. Only one in five people opposes such a move.

This was backed up by the Melbourne Institute’s latest findings that show 57 per cent to 68 per cent of Australians agree to excluding the unvaccinated from certain public events and activities. However, between 16 per cent and 23 per cent disagree with locking out the unvaccinated.

The Melbourne Institute found a similar proportion – 57 per cent – agree that busi­nesses have a right to deny service to the unvaccinated, while one in four disagrees with businesses refusing service to the unvaccinated. …

Vaccine hesitancy is continuing to decline, with the institute’s latest figures showing a fall from 20.3 per cent on August 20 to 16.7 per cent on September 12. This is down from 35.5 per cent in mid-May.

Of this 16.7 per cent, 7.3 per cent don’t know if they will eventually take the vaccine, while 9.4 per cent say they will not.

Confidential research by the federal Health Department this month and seen by The Australian shows an even sharper decline in vaccine hesitancy to just 10 per cent, with only 3 per cent saying they definitely would not get vaccinated. …

The vaccinated feel they need protection from the unvaccinated — but if the vaccinated are somewhat protected and can spread the disease, isn’t it the other way around? It is the unvaccinated who need protection from the vaccinated.

Those who support vaccine passports to allow fully vaccinated people to attend restaurants, pubs and sporting events say it serves two main purposes.

First, it is a powerful incentive for people to get vaccinated, especially those under 30 who are the most reluctant.

Second, vaccine passports, by excluding the unvaccinated, also have the effect of reducing transmission of the virus. Because an unvaccinated person is five times likelier to spread the virus, it is logical that transmission rates in social and sporting venues, as well as workplaces, will be far less if the unvaccinated are excluded. …

Some countries have not introduced vaccine passports, or have already ditched them:

England this month abruptly dropped its plans for an official vaccine passport, with members of Boris Johnson’s Conservative party calling it a hindrance to business and an infringement of civil liberties. …

This month Denmark dropped its vaccine passport, saying it was no longer necessary because the country was 75 per cent fully vaccinated. …

Australia’s new two-tier vaccination society is almost certainly going to be a temporary one. The costs on businesses and governments of enforcing the rules indefinitely would be exorbitant.

And when vaccination rates clearly have stalled and the virus is largely at bay, the unvaccinated at some point will have to be reintegrated into mainstream life.

How about legalizing ivermectin? It worked for India, and most of Africa, and everywhere else it’s been tried.