As the West stokes fears the Taliban might seize Pakistan’s nukes, declassified files hint at the CIA’s role in their acquisition

As the West stokes fears the Taliban might seize Pakistan’s nukes, declassified files hint at the CIA’s role in their acquisition. By Kit Klarenberg.

Numerous US and UK officials, including Colonel Richard Kemp, who commanded the British Army in Afghanistan, and notorious former American national security advisor John Bolton, have expressed scaremongering concerns about an even more troubling prospect —  the Taliban getting its hands on nuclear material from neighboring Pakistan. …

Pakistan’s push for nuclear weapons began in 1967, in response to India’s nuclear program, and became turbocharged in the wake of the Bangladesh Liberation War, in which Islamabad was comprehensively crushed, losing 150,000 square kilometers of territory as well as over half its population to the newly-independent state. …

It was only in January 1979 that [US] officials had concrete confirmation Islamabad was enriching uranium using gas centrifuge technology …

Yet the White House was seemingly startled by Pakistan’s progress. This surprise is baffling, given the CIA was well-positioned to keep an extremely close eye on sensitive Pakistani government communications at this time. Islamabad was one of a large number of countries to use encryption devices supplied by Swiss firm Crypto AG to shield its high-level diplomatic transmissions from prying eyes. Little did any of the machines’ purchasers know, the company was secretly owned by the CIA, and West German intelligence. This connivance meant the pair — and the National Security Agency and Britain’s GCHQ — could easily decode any messages sent via Crypto AG devices.

It’s likely that a great many messages related to the covert and illegal nuclear weapons program were exchanged using these machines, given that the effort was highly international in nature. Central to this conspiracy was Abdul Qadeer Khan, a Belgian-educated metallurgist, who had stolen gas centrifuge technology while working in the Netherlands for Anglo-Dutch-German consortium URENCO. He then began using his overseas contacts to source sensitive machinery from all over Europe, which would allow Islamabad to develop nukes. …

The CIA also apparently didn’t detect Khan’s creation of a “nuclear supermarket” under its nose, through which he sold the foundational components of nuclear weapons to a variety of foreign governments, including Saudi Arabia, let alone subvert its operation. This is widely portrayed as a mere, if major, intelligence failure on the CIA’s part.

An alternative explanation, never seemingly hitherto entertained, is that the Agency approved of Khan’s activities, wanted him to proceed, and actively shielded him from other prying eyes in Washington.

His supermarket remained in operation for many years – in the meantime, he began serving as an official adviser to the Pakistani government on science and technology, and became a much-loved public figure in the country. In 1998, he became celebrated as ‘Mohsin e-Pakistan’ (Saviour of Pakistan), after the country detonated six nuclear bombs at a test site. …

After all, if the Taliban does acquire nuclear technology, it might represent the gravest example of CIA ‘blowback’yet identified.

Pakistani intelligence created and supplied the Taliban, and Pakistan has lots of atomic bombs. Allahu akbar.

Since the 1930s there have been many instances of US policy makers (at all levels) and intelligence services acting as if they are working in the interests of communism. Sadly, given this past and the current elite dogma that the United States is irredeemably racist etc, we cannot rule out the possibility that some part of the US elite thinks it might be cool to arm the Taliban with loads of modern conventional arms and a few atomic bombs. It would be another example of Islam and communism teaming up to bring down their common enemy, western civilization.

hat-tip Stephen Neil