Is it racist to confront a suicide bomber? Lives depend on your answer.

Is it racist to confront a suicide bomber? Lives depend on your answer. By Brendan O’Neill.

The independent inquiry into the Manchester Arena bombing of May 2017, in which 22 pop fans were killed by an Islamist extremist, has published the first volume of its report. It makes for chilling reading.

The inquiry has found there were numerous ‘missed opportunities’ to confront Salman Abedi, the bomber, and potentially stop him from detonating the device in his rucksack. Most chilling of all is the reason given by one of the key security guards on patrol that evening as to why he failed to question Abedi. He was worried, he said, that asking a brown-skinned man why he was hanging around the arena might be construed as racist.

 

 

Take that in. There was a very shifty-looking young man around the foyer and mezzanine of the Manchester Arena towards the end of an Ariana Grande concert, carrying a ‘bulging’ rucksack so large he ‘struggled’ under the weight of it, and a security guard was reluctant to confront him lest he be accused of racism. …

Is the Pope Catholic? (Not the current one, but all the others.)

Is it possible that the fear of being thought of as racist is screwing up everyday life, and even hindering sensible action in threatening situations? …

It is disturbing to read the list of ‘missed opportunities’. Abedi was in the arena for more than an hour and a half before he detonated his bomb. He arrived at 20.51 and blew himself up at 22.31, as the concert attendees started to leave. In that time, this young man with a massive rucksack was seen by numerous people. …

Remarkably, some people at the arena who saw Abedi thought to themselves that he was a suicide bomber. Christopher Wild and his partner, Julie Whitley, who were picking up Whitley’s daughter, discussed the possibility that Abedi had a bomb in his rucksack. Wild actually did confront Abedi and asked him what was in his bag. Abedi nervously brushed him off. Wild reported his concerns to security guards at 22.15 — 16 minutes before the explosion — but he was ‘fobbed off’. Another parent said the security guards were ‘really quite dismissive’ of Wild’s concerns. …

The report documents the security guard’s concerns. ‘[He] was fearful of being branded a racist’, it says. The security guard ‘hesitated to report SA [Salman Abedi] because of his concern about what the reaction might be’. He was worried that ‘he might be accused of racism’. …

We already know that numerous local authorities around the country failed to confront grooming gangs of largely Pakistani heritage because they were worried about appearing racist or stirring up racist feelings in the populace.

The left has a lot to answer for with its racial policies and obsessions.

hat-tip Stephen Neil