Scott Morrison targets ALP’s true believers

Scott Morrison targets ALP’s true believers. By Greg Brown.

With the majority of votes counted [in Saturday’s NSW state by-election in the Hunter Valley], … Labor had lost almost 7 per cent of its first preference vote –- with about 20 per cent of the primary vote. …

In 2007, its candidate recorded 31.3 per cent of the first preference count and in 2019 had 32.5 per cent. …

The great realignment rolls on:

Scott Morrison says the values of working-class voters are now more aligned with the Coalition than Labor as government strategists focus on ALP heartland seats ahead of the next federal election.

The Prime Minister, in an interview with The Australian, said lower- and middle-income voters wanted to be empowered to be “in charge of their own lives” and did not see themselves as “held back as some sort of a victim of the system” — signalling a push to win over voters in long-held Labor seats including the NSW Hunter Valley and Sydney’s western suburbs. …

The Nationals party won with a two-party-preferred swing towards it in Upper Hunter — despite its former MP resigning after it emerged he was under investi­gation on sexual assault alle­gations …

Mr Morrison, in an interview before the outcome of the by-­election was known, said Labor had “treated people for decades as victims and (said) that only ­government can help them”. “They don’t think like that at all,” he said. They haven’t thought like that, if at all, certainly not for a very long time. …

The loss in Upper Hunter, which overlaps the marginal federal Labor seat of Hunter held by former resources spokesman Joel Fitzgibbon, has reignited an internal debate over whether Labor was doing enough to reach some of its traditional voters who had moved elsewhere.

Mr Fitzgibbon said federal Labor leader Anthony Albanese had not done enough to reverse a slide in the party’s blue-collar vote, criticising a decision to oppose a government-funded gas plant announced by the Coalition ahead of the Upper Hunter by-election.

Oh, get more real. Australia’s Labor party, like mainstream left parties everywhere, have principally become the party of the rich and the middle class professionals who service them. They despise the working class as deplorable — and their disdain and feelings of superiority are not always well disguised.

The Hunter Valley is an industrial region, with traditional working class voters who are threatened by the left’s climate change nonsense. The ALP is trying to appeal to its urban wealthy voters and the industrial working class simultaneously, which is pretty much impossible without lying to at least one group.