Craig Kelly poses an existential problem for the Australian Liberal Party. 

Craig Kelly poses an existential problem for the Australian Liberal Party. By Alexandra Marshall.

Censorship is the product of weakness. …

While Labor enjoys the flattery of the press, Liberals must remain disciplined, understanding that they are talking through the media, not to them.

A publicly-funded media class that works for the opposition can never be wooed or placated. Futile attempts made by Liberals to bend to their demands have achieved nothing except the weakening of the party. Liberals do not make themselves more popular in the press by becoming a poor copy of Labor. …

But is political debate really dead? The noise of question time might fool a casual observer into thinking that political conflict is alive, but listen closely and you will hear its reduction to fits of vacuous point-scoring. …

Craig Kelly, the member for Hughes, is the closest Australia has to a mimic of Menzies’ philosophy. He is what modern society has come to know as a ‘culture warrior’, with his personally run social media engagements outstripping the Prime Minister and the Leader of the Opposition. What he has to say connects with ordinary people, who too often are left to watch helplessly as the major political parties copy each other’s dodgy positions until there is little to choose between them to the point where ‘we’re not as bad as Labor’ has become the Liberal campaign line. …

Kelly has lived a life of hard work, not privilege, raising two children one of whom is disabled. He used his position to fix the injustices and failures that he found in the bureaucratic system, rather than following the path of so many ‘moderates’ who spend their days setting up future employment in international bodies or as lobbyists for corporations who owe them favours.

His loyalty to grassroots issues explains why he has held onto a marginal seat for eleven years. This leaves the Liberal Party with a problem. Craig Kelly’s success is their failure. He remains resolute at the heart of the Liberal Party’s founding ideals with a commitment to freedom, small government, and responsible economics while standing opposed to the creation of corporate oligarchies suffocating what Menzies called ‘the backbone of Australia’ – family businesses.

When Kelly sees the United Nations and its vast network of predatory corporate friends conspiring to create an empire out of green tax — he rightly calls them out while his peers bow and scrape to despots and dictators. He can see what middle Australia sees; globalism, the newest iteration of socialism, taking hold of Australia’s political system with powerful friends on both sides, especially in the energy industry.

Everyone expects the likes of Kevin Rudd, Anthony Albanese, and the combined weight of the Canberra press gallery to demand Craig Kelly’s head. As Labor drifts closer to socialism, their urge to exert supremacy over speech intensifies. Kelly is merely the first name on their list.

What matters is how the Liberal Party treats the last surviving vestige of their heritage. Scott Morrison has rightly remained silent on the demands of his peers to silence the member for Hughes. No doubt the Prime Minister is conscious of his patchy conservative record, living as one of Turnbull’s creatures and already on the nose with the base who have been financially and emotionally jaded by his policies. Allowing the factions to close rank on Kelly would be fatal at the next Federal election, particularly in National seats where voters are already eyeing off third parties.

We’ve spoken with Craig. Great guy. We need more like him in the Australian Parliament.