Election Lawsuits Move Forward Despite Silencing Crusade

Election Lawsuits Move Forward Despite Silencing Crusade. By Julie Kelly.

After refusing to fast-track election-related lawsuits before Inauguration Day, the Supreme Court now confronts several pending cases alleging voting illegalities in swing states.

Pennsylvania:

On Friday, two days after Joe Biden is sworn in as the 46th president of the United States, a response is due in President Trump’s lawsuit against Kathy Boockvar, Pennsylvania’s unelected secretary of state. …

Almost 2 million mail-in votes were cast for Joe Biden — four times the number for Trump — giving Biden his 82,000 vote victory. Trump’s attorneys correctly argue that “non-legislative officials . . . ignored or significantly altered and thereby violated state election law including . . . laws enacted to minimize the risk of fraud in mail-in voting.” The super-majority Democratic Pennsylvania Supreme Court thrice dismissed clear violations of state election law; signature verification, required mail-in ballot declarations, and observers’ proximity to the canvassing process all were scuttled by partisan bureaucrats then endorsed by the state’s top court. …

Two additional lawsuits filed before Election Day — one by the Pennsylvania Republican Party and one by the state’s Republican senate president — that challenge Boockvar’s three-day deadline extension for receipt of mail-in ballots, including those without postmarks, remain on the court’s conference list; an update on both cases is expected January 19. …

Wisconsin:

The Trump campaign has two separate lawsuits pending before the court related to Wisconsin’s fraudulent election, naming the Biden campaign, election officials in Milwaukee and Dane Counties, and the Wisconsin Election Commission as defendants.

In 2020, Badger State election workers broke several laws; mail-in ballots were illegally “cured” by county officials and public events organized by Democrats allowed for the illegal harvesting of thousands of mail-in ballots where chain of custody was not secured. …

Trump’s legal team identified 51,125 unlawful absentee ballots; Biden won Wisconsin by less than 21,000 votes. In a 4-3 ruling on December 14, the Wisconsin Supreme Court rejected Team Trump’s pleading mostly based on “laches,” the idea it was too late for the court to intercede. …

Responses to both Wisconsin lawsuits are due February 3.

Others:

A handful of other election lawsuits seem unlikely to proceed, including Lin Wood’s suit against Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger, Sidney Powell’s lawsuit against Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer, and Arizona Republican Party Chairman Kelli Ward’s case against election officials and Biden electors in her state. …

Where this could lead:

It’s anyone’s guess as to what the Supreme Court will do over the next several weeks. If the past is prologue, the majority will again shirk their constitutional duties by seeking some procedural excuse rather than consider the overwhelming evidence before the court. The highest court will follow the lower courts’ craven lead.

But what if the justices do take up these lawsuits? What if the court rules that unelected authorities in Pennsylvania and Wisconsin in fact broke election laws, delegitimizing Biden’s 30 electoral votes from both states? Biden would still have enough electoral votes to have won the presidency — 276 rather than 306 — but such a verdict would lend even more credence to the view that laws were violated in other swing states, too. …

For now, nothing changes the belief shared by the president and the overwhelming majority of Republicans that fraudulent mail-in votes put Joe Biden across the finish line; no amount of intimidation, bullying, or deplatforming will change that view.

The former vice president and his running mate will take the oath of office Wednesday amid an unprecedented, theatrical security presence in the nation’s capital, stagecraft designed to send a message to tens of millions of Americans who doubt the election’s outcome to get on board or else.