Multiculturalism has weakened Victoria, leaving it more likely to get smashed by a pandemic and the evidence is now undeniable

Multiculturalism has weakened Victoria, leaving it more likely to get smashed by a pandemic and the evidence is now undeniable. By Andrew Bolt.

On Tuesday, Chief Health officer Brett Sutton insisted this failure was not the government’s alone.

Accuse him of buck-passing if you like, but Sutton argued that Victoria’s contact tracers faced “profoundly different” challenges to those in other states.

He didn’t actually say those challenges came from Victoria’s new immigrant communities. He’s a Victorian bureaucrat, after all, and last month had to apologise in Farsi and Urdu for singling out Afghan families.

But what Sutton described made clear what he meant.

What made the job harder in Victoria, he said, included dealing with affected households “twice to three times that size … of an average Victorian household”, as well as “issues of visa status, issues of language and cultural barriers”.

What Sutton was hinting at — and what the Press Council has been asked to punish me for saying — is that multiculturalism has weakened Victoria, leaving it more likely to get smashed by a pandemic.

The evidence is now undeniable. This virus hit hardest in suburbs with big foreign-born communities, and in schools, housing commission towers or businesses with many immigrants.

The Andrews government has complained that even translating virus warnings into 53 languages was not enough to reach some communities, which seemed disconnected from Australian media.

No wonder, given that a co-ordinator of its virus response said even many security staff at the two hotels from which the virus escaped had cultural or “language barriers” making it harder to get them to follow health instructions.

But no surprise that this should be a problem in Victoria, where multiculturalism is a faith.

So mad is the Andrews government for multiculturalism that it even gave the biggest security contract for its quarantine hotels — $30 million — to a non-preferred tenderer, Unified Security, on the apparent grounds that it was at least “Indigenous owned”.

Unified was in charge of the hotel from which the worst of this virus outbreak escaped. Victoria’s new motto: go woke and die.

So the Victorian catastrophe is not just a failure of a government. It is also a failure of an immigration intake, plus multicultural policies, that produced a fractured people that cannot be trusted to voluntarily do their basic civic duty in a pandemic — keep a social distance, wash hands and don’t work or socialise when sick.

A high trust society is becoming a low trust society. Most Australians don’t want high immigration (especially from less compatible cultures) to judge by polls, and never voted for it. Yet, courtesy of our unelected ruling class who think they know better, we have the highest per capita immigration rate of any major country. How many more catastrophes will this lead to?