An Orgy of Anti-White Hatred Erupts on Social and Mainstream Media

An Orgy of Anti-White Hatred Erupts on Social and Mainstream Media, by Danusha Goska.

Folks who rarely take to Facebook stampeded to keyboards, stood tiptoe on virtual boxes, pounded their chests, and typed in all caps. Many rich, white, liberal (RWL) posters on social media joined, in a virtual sense, in the rioting and looting.

By the “rich” in “rich, white liberal” I don’t mean Jeff-Bezos-level money. I mean people who choose to live in mostly-white, bourgeois enclaves, people who have never lived in a majority-minority inner city, who have never been left exposed and vulnerable by an absent or hamstrung local police force, who have never had to take public transportation ten miles from their home to buy groceries, because, after the riots of the 1960s, all the local grocery stores packed up and left, whose school-age children can get summer jobs, because there are still local businesses, people who don’t have to pay extortionate rates for car and homeowner insurance. These are comfortable people who own, inherit, and bequeath property, and want to retain the rights they exercise under a capitalist system protected by the police and the military. …

Celebrities are virtue-signalling big time. One of many examples:

Billie Eilish reached to the depths of her accumulated 18-year-old pop singer wisdom and posted a lengthy, all-caps, obscenity-laced, anti-white rant. Whites are as stupid as “children,” whites are “motherf—ers.” Whites “are not in need. Are not in danger.” Rather, “Black people are killed just for being black.” “Why are white people given opportunities that people of other races aren’t? Society clearly thinks black lives don’t f—ing matter!” …

The meme that Brittany Spinks and thousands of others shared made clear: every time a black person dies, whiteness is responsible. Trayvon Martin, who was killed in a fight with George Zimmerman, a man whose very features announce African and Peruvian Native American ancestry, was a victim of whiteness. Though three black officers were charged in the death of Freddie Grey, Grey was a victim of whiteness. …

The Facebook meme listing a series of names doesn’t just insist that black people who are killed are always killed because of whiteness, regardless of the identity of their killer. It also insists that all black people who are killed are engaging in obviously non-threatening behavior at the time of their deaths. …

Another feature of the social media discussion of Floyd’s death was its religious fervor. The attitude was not, “Let’s present our set of facts and discuss till we reach a consensus.” Rather, anti-white rhetoric was laid down with the emotions and fanatical intransigence of religious dogma that must be upheld at any cost. Any discussion was dismissed, not as uninformed or unsupported, but rather as leprous — both disgusting and evil — and worthy only of communal stoning.

The RWLs gesticulating histrionically in this fashion were, as I knew in some cases, atheists who had abjured all religion, and indeed mocked religion. They were also people who often mocked expertise, authority, obedience, and conformity. Suddenly they were all popes, laying down dogma, demanding and exhibiting rigid conformity and announcing themselves as absolute authorities. Clearly, being a RWL was their religion, and any lack of deference to that religion was heresy, and set the heretic up not to be politely debated, but to be anathematized, bound and burned at the stake — or at the riot.

The terms “white privilege,” “white fragility” and “white supremacy” served as a shorthand to encapsulate the unique, inherent evil of whiteness. Anyone who rejected being told he or she had “white privilege” and was a subconscious “white supremacist” was objecting because he or she suffered from “white fragility.” To be white is to be tainted. The very word “white” was used to insult, denigrate, and self-flagellate. As it happens, the term “white privilege” was invented by a very wealthy white woman, a classic rich, white liberal, who has slim to no history of doing anything for black people or for black-white relations.

Doesn’t fit the narrative? Then it didn’t happen.

There’s another problem with conflating white identity with “white privilege” and criminality, as did Charles M. Blow and Apryl Williams. In response to Blow’s piece, I submitted this comment to the New York Times.

“Four of my white acquaintances, that I know of, have been raped by black men. One was young, naive, an Ivy League grad, and thin as a rail. She was teaching, as part of a volunteer program, in a bad neighborhood. The rapist broke in at night. The administrators of the program for which she volunteered were not supportive. One was, again, young, naive, and in love with African diaspora culture. She was raped by her mentor on campus. One was a child. Her wealthy parents were activists who supported the Black Panthers. The rape happened in her childhood home. Her parents were not supportive. One was a survivor of previous sexual assault. She became morbidly obese, and was trying to get her life back together by becoming physically fit. She was raped on a jogging track early in the morning. The police never found the rapist. I knew these women over the course of decades, in different towns and cities. One thing they all had in common — they discussed their rapes rarely, briefly, and in whispers, and they expected no sympathy. They knew the stereotypes of white women as Southern Belles who make false accusations that result in a lynching. This was not they, though. None were from the South. None were belles. They were victims of racist, misogynist, violent crimes.”

The New York Times declined to publish my comment. Empowered voices like Charles M. Blow and Apryl Williams silence real suffering, and distort national conversations. Influencer Billie Eilish who has, no doubt, struggled through famines and holocausts in her 18 years, insists to her influencees that whites have not suffered and that therefore whites must be silenced. She contributes to the silent shame felt by my friends who have survived politically incorrect rapes.

hat-tip Stephen Neil