Why the Australian party of the workers has a problem with working people

Why the Australian party of the workers has a problem with working people. By Luke Walladge.

Just 22 per cent of Australians hold a tertiary degree, with a slightly higher number having completed at least some post-secondary education. Yet within the active and activist ranks of the party, maybe 70-80 per cent would have a tertiary degree; fully 90 per cent of Young Labor is sourced from and organised on university campuses. You won’t find too many apprentice plumbers at your average AYL meeting. …

The average Labor staffer, activist, MP or even member tends to be — compared to the Australian mean — younger, university-educated, socially liberal, higher-income and to live closer to the inner city. They tend to be single more so than in a relationship, if they’re in a relationship more likely to be de facto than married, less likely to have children and less likely to be religious. …

A large proportion of Labor’s elite look, sound and think like Greens. …

Labor’s MPs and candidates are drawn overwhelmingly from a demographic that votes Green and indulges in post-materialist politics. So when Labor voters look for candidates and parties who look, sound and live like them, who do they see? Pauline Hanson, Ricky Muir and Jacquie Lambie. …

Educational attainment — often driven as it is by economic and social opportunity — has been mistaken for political merit. Paul Keating, Mick Young and Peter Walsh would not be amused.

Just like the ABC. Not a coincidence.