The Growing Darkness

The Growing Darkness, by the Z-Man.

The term “dark age” came into popular usage among intellectuals during the 18th century, but the term itself was actually coined by Petrarch. He was an early Italian Renaissance scholar in the 14th century. It was originally used to describe a certain period of time, but eventually became synonymous with the period between the fall of the Roman Empire and the Renaissance. The assumed lack of human progress, due to the lack of records and demographic decline, was a dark time for humanity.

The term began to fall out of usage as scholars gained a better understanding of the middle ages. The period described as dark, in terms of human accomplishment began to recede, eventually covering just the period immediately after Rome. Eventually the term fell out of fashion altogether, first because it was not terribly accurate and then because the usual suspects got involved. The image of dark versus light was seen as problematic, so now using the term is a microaggression.

That’s a good point to wonder if the West has not already entered a new dark age, in which superstition rules over rationality. The concept of the microaggression is something superstitious people living in a dark age would have understood. After all, a microaggression is the idea that certain words and phrases, incantations, will cause a miasma to develop around the people saying and hearing the words. This miasma or evil spirit will cause those exposed to react involuntarily and uncontrollably.

In fact, everything about political correctness and multiculturalism relies on oogily-boogily that people in the dark age of Europe would have found ridiculous. …’

Another way of looking at the dark age we are slipping into:

A dark age is always imagined to be a period when the stock of human knowledge stagnates or even declines. Another way to think of a dark age is one in which the people are unable to manage the complexity bequeathed to them. As a result, society goes through a period of retrenchment. …

Somewhere in the last century or maybe the prior century, people in the West began to lose the ability to control their institutions. By control, it should be understood to mean the knowledge of how they work and why they were created. It is one thing to know how to use the toilet. It is another thing to understand public sanitation and the reason it is a vital public service. People in the West no longer seem to know why their institutions exist or how they must be maintained in order to properly function.

That’s why the college campus is a good place to examine, when thinking about the crisis in the West. In theory, the people running the society of tomorrow are now being trained on the colleges of today. Yet, they are being taught things that are laughably false by people who are often suffering from mental illness. In other cases, they are taught by people who hate them and hate the West. A people who understood why these institutions were created would never have permitted this to happen.

Because people as a group are become less bright? National and world average IQs are dropping, so this all fits.