Australia’s role in Anglosphere’s finest hour

Australia’s role in Anglosphere’s finest hour, by Rebecca Weisser. First Hong Kong:

The visit to Australia of Hong Kong pop star and activist, Denise Ho, exposed the pusillanimity of Australian officialdom. An event at the National Gallery of Victoria called ‘Be Water: Hong Kong vs China’ with Ms Ho and political cartoonist Badiucao to discuss art and resistance in Hong Kong was cancelled due to ‘security concerns.’ Ms Ho rightly tweeted that ‘self-censorship is real’ and ‘if everyone turns away due to fear, what will our world become?’

At Australian campuses, the fear is real. This month, a motion in support of Hong Kong at the University of Sydney Student Representative Council brought the meeting to a standstill. When one student moved the motion, another stood up to yell in Mandarin, ‘I love China’ along with other profanities. Those who support Hong Kong were so worried about the threat to their safety posed by pro-Beijing activists that everyone had to put their phones into Airplane mode. Even so, the vote was thwarted and had to be tabled for the next meeting. …

Brexit:

There is only one response in Australia to the suggestion that Britain would face shortages if it crashes out of the EU with a ‘No Deal’ Brexit and that is, ‘not if we can help it!’ Australia already feeds some 36 million people around the world and could easily ramp that up. Our prime minister has said a free trade agreement with the UK could be concluded in less than a year and our trade minister said a deal could be done in months, maybe even weeks. …

All EU member states owe their liberty to the preparedness of British and Commonwealth peoples to lay down their lives in the fight against Nazi and German imperialism but where is the gratitude? Australia is used to this. …

When Australia was unceremoniously booted out of the UK market on its entry into the European Community in 1973 — a hard exit if ever there was one — our butter exports to the UK dropped by more than 90 percent and our apple exports by more than two thirds. But what we lost in trade to the UK, we more than made up for in exports elsewhere. More importantly, we retained that most precious commodity of all — our sovereignty. …

At this distance, the hysteria in Britain about a ‘no deal’ Brexit seems incomprehensible.