Federal Electoral Reform Needed in Australia

Federal Electoral Reform Needed in Australia, by Rite-On.

In the 2016 Federal Election, over 18,000 voters voted more than once. Voters voted at one polling booth then repeated the process at other booths in the same electorate. The current system of paper-based electoral rolls is not inter-connected, so cross- checking between booths is not possible.

These ‘multiple-voters’ are an example of fraud that takes advantage of the shortcomings of paper-based electoral rolls, rather than a memory lapse by ‘political-tragics’. The concern is that extra (fraudulent) votes affect outcomes in tight-run election races. While these repeat offenders have been asked to ‘please explain’ no-one has been prosecuted. …

If electoral offenses are not punished, the practice will continue. Paper-based electoral rolls are compromised and replacement by electronic electoral online rolls is needed. …

No personal identification is required to vote in federal elections. This lack of identification has allowed voters to abuse the system by voting under another person’s name and address. …

Electronic voting? Perhaps, if paper copies were cast and counted as well.

In the recent 18 May election, 830,000 Australian cast informal votes for the lower house, on paper-based ballot papers. Online electronic voting would help reduce the number of informal votes through mandatory ‘fill-boxes’ similar to other online registration processes. The current model of paper-based ballot slips, manual scrutineering and counting of votes comes at a huge cost to taxpayers, is time consuming and it is subject to human error. …

In the digital world where personal banking, confidential communications, online education, share trading, international money transfers, management of border security, international relations and other ‘sensitive’ activities are conducted online, encrypted online electronic voting is possible and preferable to the current paper-based, manual system.

Rite-on has a petition for electoral reform here. Visit their website here.