Conquered California

Conquered California, by David Cole.

Governor Gavin Newsom’s June 22 Facebook and Twitter address to the people of California should have been a big story in the conservative media-sphere. It wasn’t, because the right dismisses California as too far gone. …

Pay attention to California as a cautionary tale.

“Stalin” Newsom’s social media address was the speech of an occupier to a conquered people. The gist of his lecture was essentially, “Everything this state was was bad. You Californians who were here in the 1990s were monsters. But we’ve vanquished you; you’re desolated, done. Your opinions no longer matter, your accomplishments are being dismantled, and better people are replacing you.”

The speech is only a minute twenty-five. Amazingly, not a single site on the ’net has bothered to transcribe it, so I’ll do it myself (Newsom’s words are in [bold]), with heckling where appropriate. …

You know, we’ve been through this before, we lived through this same political theater in the 1990s.

According to the governor of California, what the people of California voted for in overwhelming numbers in the 1990s was merely “political theater.”

Prop. 187…

Nineteen ninety-four’s Proposition 187, also known as the Save Our State (SOS) initiative, was a ballot measure that established “a state-run citizenship screening system and prohibited illegal immigrants from using non-emergency health care, public education, and other services in the State of California.” Prop. 187 passed in a landslide: 59 percent to 41 percent. Sixty-five percent of white voters supported it. A majority of black and Asian voters supported it. Sixty-two percent of independents supported it. But apparently it was only “political theater.”

…three strikes you’re out, the fear of the other…

Cali voters passed the “three strikes” law in 1994 by a whopping 72 percent to 28 percent margin. All we were asking of our criminals was that they not commit three felonies, yet Newsom thinks we were being very unreasonable indeed. To him, three strikes represents “fear of the other”…the “other” being murderers, thieves, and rapists. And who could possibly fear them? And by the way, it’s a well-known fact that in ’94, policies like three strikes had the widespread support of black leaders looking to reduce crime in their communities. So who exactly were the “others” they feared? …

And now, back to Newsom “talking down” to us:

We’re better than that. We’re resilient. We came out stronger than ever on the other side. That’s the spirit of our state, and spirit defines this moment.

Who’s we? We passed Prop. 187. We passed three strikes. We voted to end affirmative action in universities. We voted to end bilingual education. We voted to ban gay marriage (2008!). Not all Californians who were here in the ’90s have fled. Many of us remain. But we’ve been neutered by demographic change and partisan redistricting, to the extent that “we” no longer matter…to the extent that Newsom spends the rest of his speech addressing those who are not “we”: …

We’re Californians; it’s a special place. The spirit of this state is a spirit of reconciling all our interesting differences…

…unless those differences include being right-of-center…

…uniting, as we like to say, around our common humanity. We’re better than this moment in the United States of America, and know we’re gonna get through it stronger than ever.

This isn’t a governor addressing his constituents; it’s Henry Morgenthau ostensibly addressing the conquered Germans, but in fact only speaking to the Jews and communists. “Hitler’s dead. His day is over. His supporters will be hunted to extinction and beaten down by denazification laws. You are Germany now. No one else’s voice matters. …”

To Newsom, the commonsense reforms of the ’90s were Hitlerian, and people like me are vanquished Nazis.

There’s something unique about Newsom’s speech. He’s not only badmouthing the people of his own state, he’s celebrating population replacement. “The Californians who used to live here were evil. Thankfully, we’ve silenced them or driven them out.” Maybe I’m wrong, but I can’t recall a previous example of a U.S. governor saying, “This state used to suck because bad people lived here. Now it’s finally getting to be an okay place!” …

Reflect for a moment on how healthy Cali was in the ’90s. Now look at your own state. Are you confident it can never go ass-up like mine? Don’t be. It can happen to you. Because Newsom is hardly an anomaly among today’s Democrats. He just happens to be in a position where he can “let loose” a bit more than other Dem governors. He no longer has to pay lip service to that segment of the population that disgusts him.

So, yes, it’s too late to fight for Cali. But if you live in an unconquered state, fight for it. Fight against demographic change from outside the U.S. and from within.