The white supremacy phantom

The white supremacy phantom, by Roger Kimball.

Well la-dee-dah. The House votes to condemn ‘President Trump for his “racist comments” about four Democratic congresswomen of color.’

First, I am glad that ‘racist comments’ was in scare quotes. Why? Because there was nothing racist about the president’s tweets inviting creeps like Somali-born Rep. Ilhan Omar to leave the United States if she doesn’t like it here.

Second, I wish people would give the phrase ‘people of color’ a rest. Everyone is a color — even, I suppose, Albinos (is that ‘racist’ now, too?). I, for example, am a pleasing pink.

But the fact that someone is dark-skinned imparts to him no special virtue, just as the fact that someone is Caucasian saddles him with no special liability.

Except, alas, that it does. At least in the racist court of identity politics.

Please note the absence of scare quotes around ‘racist’ this time. It is one of the signal moral and intellectual deformations of our time that many people strain every action through the sieve of racial redress. The result is that a pretended campaign against racism is fueled by a thoroughly racist imperative. Remember that the next time someone condemns the phantom of ‘white supremacy.’ …

The upcoming conflict is increasingly veering off into tribalism:

Maybe the tetrarchy of AOC, Omar, and the other two ladies whose names I forget will be able to drive Donald Trump from office because he tweeted something they find offensive. The economic performance of the country, the stunning unemployment figures, the energy independence of the country, the judicial appointments, the roll-back of onerous regulation, the dazzling stock market — forget all that: Donald Trump said something these moist and agitated anti-Semites don’t like. Definitely grounds for impeachment. …

Polarizing:

I entered this fray as a dedicated anti-Trumper. I wrote, gosh, a score of articles criticizing Trump in the most categorical terms.

But then the worst happened and the choice was Donald Trump or Hillary Clinton. I have rehearsed all of this before and will not repeat it now. Suffice it to say that I regarded the choice as binary. I was not going to throw my vote away on Evan McMuffin or whatever his name was. It was Hillary, who was impossible, or Trump, who was merely frightful.

I chose frightful and have been pleasantly surprised. As I have said many times over the last couple of years, Donald Trump has presided over the most astonishingly successful opening years as president in a very long time, maybe ever. I don’t worry about his ‘character’ or his Tabasco tweets. I rather enjoy them, to tell the truth, not least because they challenge the pieties of political correctness. …

Donald Trump is a risk taker. He also loves tweaking people. Much of what he says offends the commentariat. They are appalled at his bad manners, his insensitivity, his boorishness. It’s my sense, though, that the country at large finds it rather refreshing — odd, perhaps, maybe a little worrisome, but refreshing.