The autumn of our minor discontent: or 24 thoughts about the election

The autumn of our minor discontent: or 24 thoughts about the election, by Arthur Chrenkoff.

Tim Andrews…: “The Australian Labor Party ran on higher taxes, higher spending, more regulations, and destroying our economy with carbon taxes. This was – for the first time in over two decades – a clear election, a clear choice about ideology and the future of Australia. And despite all the polls, despite the left outspending the right by millions, the Australian people did what no one expected and rejected the odious big government narrative. This is huge.” …

Despite of what you will hear frequently over the coming days, this is not a victory for racism, bigotry, populism, Trumpism and so on. No amount of money could turn Clive Palmer into Trump, and Australian political system simply is not prone to those sorts of phenomena. And if you think that ScoMo is some sort of a maverick you have been drinking too much “potato head bad” Kool-Aid. …

Shorten … was probably the biggest drag on the Labor vote. People just couldn’t get to like him and trust him. Anyone else would have likely won it for Labor, and won it handsomely. …

The government wasn’t loved but it wasn’t loathed enough to balance the fears about what Labor might do to Australia again, particularly under an unlikable and unprincipled leader. …

It’s also time enough to acknowledge the increasingly prominent phenomenon Australia now shares with the UK and the US: “the shy Libs”. …

There will be no doubt many debates in the future as to why the right of centre voters are increasingly “shy”, but there is no doubt that the phenomenon is real. I can’t speak about the opinion polling, but I saw it very clearly on the election day itself. Judging by the demeanor of voters and their reactions while confronted with party workers handing out “how to vote cards”, I would have guessed that Labor and the Greens took three quarters of the vote on my polling booth. But when we actually counted the votes, the two-party-preferred vote between the Liberals (or the LNP) and Labor was less than 12 votes of 2000 cast.