US Democrats win House; Republicans keep Senate

Democrats win House, by ABC. See graphics. Democrats flip 34 seats.

Republicans keep Senate, by ABC. See graphics. Republicans pick up 3 seats.

Republican Sen. Ted Cruz Holds On To Seat Against Democrat Beto O’Rourke.

DeSantis defeats Gillum in Florida.

Sadly the left will feel like they have won — at least by enough that it doesn’t require them to change course. If they had lost then they might have stopped to re-examine their policies and tactics.

With this weak win under their belts, the left will double down. They are convinced that they were robbed of the Hillary presidency — by the Russians, the voting system, or whatever — so Trump is illegitimate and resistance in all its forms is morally justified.

This means they will continue to feel free to cheat and lie (as over Ford and Kavanaugh) and to use political violence (from Hillary’s encouragement of uncivil behavior through to Antfia’s violence on the streets).

The US is a two party democracy. Each party will spend about half the time in power. So we need both parties to have more or less sensible policies. Sadly the US left is currently moving out to an extreme, towards more bigotry and identity politics on the one hand, coupled with increased immigration from the third world on the other. All this for electoral advantage, to win elections by replacing the electorate.

This is very short sighted of the whites who currently run the US left. Even if the Democrats win elections from here to foreseeable eternity on the back of non-white votes, there will be increasingly few whites elected within the Democrat Party — because that Party will be dominated by identity groups encouraged to hate whites. Either way, the current leftist US whites lose. Shame they are taking the rest of the west down with them.

As for the result, well, as they say: gridlock is the next best thing to constitutional government.

Steve Hayward:

The votes are still coming in of course, but it is pretty clear that the blue tsunami did not happen, and the blue wave is a three-footer with barely a curl and not much of a riptide or undertow. The GOP held on to several tough districts that would have been swept away in a true wave election. …

So Democrats are in a peculiar position. They will claim victory for their House takeover and be all smiles tomorrow, but are otherwise going to be very disappointed, and the disappointment may grow as the House fails to impeach President Trump, or even get very far with committee investigations. …

Bottom line: The GOP losses tonight are fairly modest by historical standards.

Sarah Hoyt:

[The Republicans] failed to beat the margin of fraud. Maybe it was inevitable. Maybe Trump won in 16 because they seriously underestimated him. …

The Dems get two years to hide whatever inky stuff has been going on with the FBI/CIA. After another two years that swamp might be permanent. …

Trump is by nature a deal maker. After the first two government shut downs, he’ll meet them halfway. This will wreck our economy and yep his presidency with it. As they did with Bush in 2006, [the Dems] now have a chance to wreck the economy and have it blamed on the sitting president.

Border security? What border security? More Dem voters, citizenship being insignificant. …

Yeah, [the Dems] threw a lot of money at this. But let’s be real, if they can win the House on promises to raise our taxes and throttle our energy production and, oh, yeah, impeach the president that finally got the economy going? We need to up our game, and somehow we need to clean up vote fraud. Which is now infinitely harder to do, since the loons got the power.

Identity politics emerges in the voting patterns:

Who and What Will the Democrats Blame for Ho-Hum Evening? By Steve Sailer.

In the Eastern Time Zone, the Democrats’ Blue Wave is looking pretty small so far. If this trend holds up, who and what do you think the Democrats and their media enablers will blame?

  • Putin
  • White men
  • Not enough black murderers being allowed to vote
  • The Voting Rights Act of 1982 that mandates gerrymandering of black and Latino districts to enable more black and Latino Democrats to be elected (Ha ha, just kidding, mentioning that would be racist) …
  • The Constitution
  • GOP control of the media
  • Patriarchy
  • Americans …
  • Too much noticing …
  • The Caravan didn’t arrive on time …
  • The unintersectional …

Huffington Post:

It wasn’t quite the wave that Democrats were hoping for. Even with a nine-point advantage in the popular vote, Republicans fended off the worst case scenarios in the House and actually improved their majority in the Senate, as Indiana, Missouri and Florida ― states that voted for President Donald Trump in 2016 ― sent their Democratic senators packing. …

One of the major lessons for Republicans may be that they need to embrace Trump’s style even more. A blue wave for Democrats never really materialized because Republicans were able to energize their own voters through a campaign full of racial anxiety and culture war items. …

The primary message from Democrats during the 2018 campaign ― that they would protect health care for the sick while Republicans would undermine it ― did seem to resonate across the country. Democrats used almost every opportunity they could to redirect conversations back to health care.

Gerald F. Seib:

US President Donald Trump didn’t need to win today’s mid-terms so much as he needed to avoid disaster. And that’s pretty much what happened.

The country now stands not far from where it was when Mr Trump won his shocking victory in 2016: deeply divided in its politics as well as its views of the 45th president. The difference now is that the country appears even more deeply split, with blue Democratic areas moving further away from the president and red Republican sectors growing more loyal to him. …

House Democrats now will provide a foil for the president, providing him with an enemy to blame for any policy failures — and in particular for any economic decline that might ensue after years of steady economic growth. …

For Mr Trump and his business allies, keeping control of the Senate means there is no danger that the tax cuts and deregulatory measures of the first two years of his term will be rolled back. Crucially, the Republican campaign to redraw the federal courts with a steady stream of conservative judges can and will continue.

Moreover, the Senate that emerges from Tuesday’s voting will be more friendly to the president than was the version of the last two years. The GOP Senators who were most vexsome to the president — Sen. Jeff Flake of Arizona and Sen. Bob Corker of Tennessee, neither of whom sought re-election — are gone, and those who remain owe Mr Trump a debt of gratitude. …

Mr Trump met a powerful force in the form of women voters, who made up 52% of the voters and went for Democrats by an 18-point margin overall.