The left versus Christianity round 839: Australian gays

The left versus Christianity round 839: Australian gays. By Mark Latham.

One of the weaknesses in the Australian education system is a lack of understanding of civics. Teaching children the basics of our democracy has been supplanted by the wacky world of identity politics. Greater priority is given to indoctrination programs on ‘gender fluidity’, ‘penis tucking’ and ‘breast binding’ than knowing the contents of the Australian Constitution. …

At Section 116 it states, ‘The Commonwealth shall not make any law for establishing any religion, or for imposing any religious observance, or for prohibiting the free exercise of any religion.’ That is, the federal government cannot force people into religious practice or restrict the freedom of established religions. The clause says nothing about protecting people of valid religious faith from vilification and discrimination by non-government entities — the core problem facing our Christians today. We have entered an era of human rights revenge, requiring an overhaul of human rights law. …

Take the example of gay-left politics. In terms of wealth, income, education levels and access to the media, this community sits well above the national average. It enjoys a successful, privileged place in Australian society. Yet instead of saluting these achievements, gay-left activists are trying to get even with Christians for things that happened decades ago. …

Religious freedom should be protected in two significant ways. The first is to outlaw discrimination against people of faith (the Court case) and attempts to limit their freedom of speech (the Folau case).

The second protection is to ensure government laws do not force people of valid religious faith to do things they regard as morally wrong. In public debate, this is often referred to as the case of the Christian baker asked to prepare a cake for a same-sex wedding celebration.

History tells us that when governments have the power to make people do things they regard to be morally wrong, we move one step closer to a police state.

hat-tip Stephen Neil, Barry Corke