If I let Islam be, Islam doesn’t let me be

If I let Islam be, Islam doesn’t let me be, by Amil Imani.

Once I left Iran, my battle with this dogma of hate and violence began. I decided to raise the clarion call about the imminent and present danger of expansionist, theocratic Islam throughout the civilized world. Having witnessed firsthand the horrors and indignity that Islamic doctrine visits on people it subjugates, I was determined to take it upon myself to do my part in defeating this ideology of oppression, hate and violence.

If Islam is not for you, then leave it and let it be, some may say. That may be the right thing to do in many situations in life — a sort of live and let live philosophy. But in this case, it is a grievous act to do so. …

Simply put, if I let Islam be, Islam doesn’t let me be. Islam doesn’t live by the same rules of reciprocity. Islam doesn’t recognize my rights and the rights of all non-Muslims. The punishment to leave Islam is death. …

The notion of apostasy in Islam is something we all need to understand. It is best understood within the overall Islamic dogma. Islam forms a binding covenant with the believer. Once a person is Muslim, he and his issue are considered Muslim forever. In this covenant, Islam promises to bestow its beneficence on the faithful, conditional on the person’s total and unquestioned surrender to it in all matters. …

Islam is on the march, and it aims to destroy anything and anyone that stands in its way. Sounding the clarion call is not Islamophobia, as many Muslims and their apologists claim. A phobia is a baseless irrational fear. Warning of the danger of Islam is based on irrefutable facts, and it is not only rational, it is ethically imperative.

hat-tip Stephen Neil