Latham’s law

Latham’s law, by Mark Latham.

Higher education has deteriorated so badly, so quickly we are now involved in a civilisational struggle to bring it back into the mainstream of society. This is critical work, requiring a new approach to university funding and staffing. Institutions that abandon the Australian values of freedom, pluralism and meritocracy can no longer expect to be funded by the Australian taxpayer. To earn the gift of public money they need to serve the public interest. The evidence suggests universities now serve themselves, having been colonised by mutant strains of left-wing activism. …

How can the scale of the takeover be measured? Fortunately there’s a ready reckoner: the essays published daily on the Conversation website, billed by Australia’s university sector as ‘unlocking the knowledge of researchers and academics to (solve) society’s biggest problems.’

I’ve read this material for the first three weeks of July, a total of 122 items, reflecting the priorities of the nation’s scholars. What type of issues are they interested in? By far the largest category is environmental advocacy, with 27 articles or one-quarter of the total. …There were seven essays on Aboriginal victimhood, three on refugees and ten on foreign policy, mostly Trump Derangement Syndrome. Left-feminism was also prominent, with ten items. …

A key goal of neo-Marxist politics is to interfere in the nuclear family, to spread Safe Schools-style notions of gender fluidity. Universities are taking this a step further, shadowing the decisions of parents in how they raise their kids. One in nine of the Conversation essays were about children. A special section has been developed on ‘evidence-based parenting’. Australian academics have become obsessed with other people’s children — a creepy, new dimension to university life.

The remaining essays focused on miscellaneous left-wing themes, such as supporting the ABC, re-regulating the economy, increasing education funding and legalising cannabis. None of them called for a cut to Big Australia immigration. Only one of the 122 articles advocated micro-economic reform as a way of lowering unemployment (via greater labour market flexibility). …

The university system is a striking example of Insider/Outsider politics. As taxpayers, the Outsider majority of Australians are forced into funding the wacky, self-indulgent research of an Insider minority. This is one of many ways in which we have become a divided nation. …

People in [in the seat of Longman, north of Brisbane] lie awake at night worrying about their family budget, while inner-city academics are paid to study the sleeping habits of Mr and Mrs ‘Gender Inequality’. We can’t continue as two Australias. People in the suburbs and regions have real-life problems requiring serious solutions. If the university system is off on a tangent, peddling irrelevant sludge, it should be defunded. Only by returning to the mainstream can it be worthy of public support and public money.

hat-tip Stephen Neil