Xena madness

Xena madness, by Hal Colebatch.

For sheer grotesquerie, a recent push for the feminisation of the Australian Army would be hard to beat. Former General David Morrison, mincing about in women’s shoes, was the veriest amateur when it comes to official destruction of the Army’s traditions and values of masculinity and fighting efficiency. …

Former Major Bernard Gaynor, a decorated combat soldier sacked from first the regular Army and then the Reserve for his campaign against political correctness in the military, has discovered a lengthy (237-page) official Army paper, Teaming: optimising military capability for the coming era of equality: 2020 to 2050, by Major Elizabeth G. Boulton.

It claims future Australian soldiers may be modelled on the kids’ TV sword-wielding heroine, Xena, Warrior Princess. Their mission will be, apparently, to defend the country from marauding hoardes of enemy Xenas. ‘I wish,’ Gaynor writes, ‘that I was making this up. But I’m not.’ He explains: ‘The document, published by the Army for incorporation into future policy and capability planning, states that between 2020 and 2050 the threats Australia faces are likely to be female-led and female-dominated. In response, the Army should enable the emergence of a Xena warrior cult within Australian women. ‘And consideration should be given to reducing special forces’ fitness standards to enable ‘Xena’ to thrive as a warrioress.’

Xena — a triumph of ideology and wishful thinking over reality and biology. Our ruling class — easily sucked in, but unfortunately in charge.

Xena Warrior Princesses exist in comic fantasies for physically, mentally or emotionally adolescent boys. …

The paper is illustrated by, among other things, a statue of Queen Boudica driving a chariot. It does not mention that the hordes of Britons she commandeered were notorious for massacring civilians and were decisively beaten when finally brought to battle, by a much smaller, tightly professional, army of Romans. Roman men, that is. …

Israel, with manpower problems compared to its likely enemies, tried women in combat and abandoned the experiment as hopeless …

hat-tip Stephen Neil