Who really won the sexual revolution?

Who really won the sexual revolution? by Jonathon McClintock.

Chivalry is a virtue, but only when exercised responsibly. Unfortunately, men have so gone overboard in their chivalry that many women no longer realise that they are the weaker sex. This has resulted in women engaging in behaviour not conducive to their well-being or that of society.

Cory Bernardi and Andrew Hastie’s reservations about women assuming combat roles represents the possibility of gentlemen exercising their chivalry in a more responsible manner, one that gently reminds women not to forget themselves. The issue of women in combat roles like the infantry ought to become a staple of conservative agitation, especially given its profound implications and symbolism. …

Women can only make a show of fighting for their rights if their men gallantly allow them to do so. In such chivalrous societies, strong and independent women know that their power ultimately lies in being able to make a scene to get their way, safe in the knowledge that gentlemen are obliged to back away in such circumstances. Thus do the feminists exult in their “strength”. This is how the suffragettes used their “power”; and this is how modern feminists like Van Badham – prone to behaving hysterically – also use it. …

However, the absence of the gentleman is nevertheless painfully felt when the all-important requirement for consent in sex is technically met, leaving women vulnerable to ungentlemanly (though not criminal) conduct from the likes of Harvey Weinstein.

I do not blame the feminists for this state of affairs but rather the overindulgent gentlemen who have allowed for this. Women, as a result, are losing all touch with reality. When Bernardi, complaining about the inappropriateness of having women in combat roles, rhetorically asked why women are not allowed to compete with men in contact sports like rugby, Senator Linda Reynolds refused to acknowledge this checkmate. Instead, she proceeded to call for a debate to allow mix-gendered teams in the AFL, NRL and rugby union! This, nota bene, was coming from a former senior military officer and now senator. If such a delusional person can rise almost to the rank of general and is now apparently a rising star in the Liberal Party, then this does not bode well for the future. …

Ordinary Australians are not as delusional as Senator Reynolds seems to be.

Because of this, focussing on the issue of women in frontline combat roles will not cross the threshold gentlemen are normally held hostage to, whereby a feminist can make a scene in the hope that the gentleman will be forced to back away and give way. On this particular issue, any woman playing the make-a-scene card will just look ridiculous in the eyes of ordinary Australians, who are still prepared to acknowledge the most basic physical differences between men and women and will not advocate for women in combat or women in men’s rugby teams.