In Malcolm Turnbull’s office, you’re either “compliant or an enemy’’.

In Malcolm Turnbull’s office, you’re either “compliant or an enemy’’. By Andrew Clennell.

There’s a common whinge that Turnbull’s office is loaded with Liberals who live in the eastern suburbs of Sydney — people of Turnbull stock; not the types to know what hits people in the mortgage-belt suburbs. …

“Malcolm’s office is very Sydney eastern suburbs … so of course they hear different things from what we’re concerned about — which is energy prices and immigration. …

2016 election: Not the Liberal Party, but “Turnbull’s team”.

“People had a perception (when Turnbull came to power) that they saw him as about the republic, same-sex marriage, the environment … those things weren’t the right thing for him to pursue … it would have blown up the partyroom.

“In the absence of that, it was like ‘what’s the next big thing?’ And there was no next big thing.”

But a senior Liberal source is more brutal: “The real problem is there isn’t a political strategist in his office.” …

There is no question that Lucy Turnbull does play a role in some of the key decisions the Prime Minister makes.

There is no greater example of that than the bonking ban — the ban deployed on ministers not to sleep with their staff as Turnbull decided to get royally stuck into Barnaby Joyce and his morals after a tough question time following revelations Joyce was expecting a child with a former staffer.

Turnbull himself has said on the record that he came to his decision after a discussion with his wife.

The “Praetorian Guard” of the right wing that Malcolm Turnbull relies upon for his survival, Mathias Cormann and Peter Dutton, had argued vehemently to Turnbull that he should not introduce the bonk ban. Cormann and Dutton also advised Turnbull against antagonising Joyce in the press conference where it was announced.

But Turnbull came to his own “captain’s call” after discussions with Lucy. …

Other signs of Lucy Turnbull’s influence include when the Prime Minister called a royal commission into juvenile detention in the Northern Territory after watching ABC’s Four Corners with his wife. …

Overreaching is a common trait — like when he went to moralise on Australia’s cheating cricketers a week ago and ended up criticising sledging when that is all politicians do every day.

The stories of the volcanic temper of Turnbull are many.

One former minister, who did not want to be named, recalls Turnbull ringing him abusively, unimpressed by his alleged behaviour and calling him the “C” word before saying both he and Lucy were very disappointed in him. …

Tony Abbott confirmed to The Australian the veracity of a reported incident in 2014 when Abbott was PM where on a plane flight back from The Australian’s 50th anniversary celebrations Turnbull told Abbott he was the most “disloyal c…” he had ever met. …

To examine Turnbull and the reason for his 30 consecutive Newspoll losses, the focus really comes on the man — not his staff or the influence of his wife. And how he is outplayed at politics constantly by Labor.