Steve Bannon Thinks Lefties Will Join His Xenophobic Crusade

Steve Bannon Thinks Lefties Will Join His Xenophobic Crusade, by Ronald Radosh.

[Bannon is] “plotting the next stage of his right-wing populist revolution” which he plans to launch this spring or summer. … “It’s going to be focused on the promulgation of ideas, the weaponizing of ideas and building and binding together through affiliate groups.” Social media will be an important component in building “a 10 million man digital and analog army.” …

He plans to recruit from Trump’s right-wing base while maintaining that he supports Trump, a stance that will be important if he is to attract Trump’s followers. He also plans to recruit from Bernie Sanders’ left-wing flank of the Democratic Party with his appeal of economic nationalism. …

The threat to the United States, and the entire West, according to Bannon, is coming from China, Iran (which he calls by its old name, Persia), and Turkey. That axis, he argues, is “confronting the Christian West” and resembles the period in the 1930s before the start of World War II. In that era, FDR had to break the isolationist mood of the country to take on the threat from Germany and its allies which of course he never really succeeded in doing until Pearl Harbor.

As for Putin’s Russia, Bannon acknowledges that “the Russians are bad guys.” Nevertheless, given the threat from the axis, he believes that the United States must “reset the relationship with Russia… and end the Cold War.” He thinks Donald Trump gets this, but most of the other political forces don’t. …

On domestic policy Bannon lines up with many on the left, whose support he hopes will shift to the new movement that he intends to build. Remember that at the time of the announcement of the tax cut introduced by Trump, Bannon argued for a much higher tax on the rich and bemoaned the fact that the bill was negligent in that regard. …

Bannon believes that on economic issues, Sanders and many self-proclaimed socialists are “economic nationalists.” They favor tough negotiations to get trade deals that benefit the American worker as well as protectionist tariffs that protect goods made in the United States, and hence the jobs of American workers. …

Bannon, who always presents himself as anti-Wall Street, although he made his fortune working at Goldman Sachs, argues that he and his new movement will represent working people.