South Africa Land Theft: Constitution All But Allows It

South Africa Land Theft: Constitution All But Allows It, by Ilana Mercer.

Up until, or on the day, a predictable calamity unfolds in South Africa, you still find Western media insisting that,

  • No, there’s no racial component to the butchering of thousands of white rural folks in ways that would make Shaka Zulu proud.
  • No, the mutilated, tortured bodies of Boer and British men, women and children aren’t evidence of racial hatred, but a mere artifact of good old crime. No hate crimes. No crimes against humanity. Move along. Let the carnage play on.

And the latest:

To listen to leftist, counterfactual, ahistoric pabulum served up by most in media, a decision by South Africa’s Parliament to smooth the way for an expropriation without compensation of private property came out of … nowhere.

It just so happened — pure fluke! — that the permanently entrenched, racialist parties in parliament used their thumping majorities to vote for legalizing state theft from a politically powerless minority. Didn’t see that coming! …

How did that country’s “vaunted” constitution yield to “the horror, the horror” of land theft?

Easily, even seamlessly — as I’ve been warning since the 2011 publication of “Into the cannibal’s Pot: Lessons for America From Post-Apartheid South Africa,” which provided the analytical edifice for what’s unfolding. You can pile more murders, more state corruption, more horror atop the same analytical foundation; but, distilled to bare bones, the truth about South Africa remains unchanged. …

As for equality before the law: The South African Bill of Rights is contemptuous of it. It enshrines group rights and allows for compensatory and distributive “justice.” …

The Hobbesian choice which the ANC had always planned to present to white farmers was between making them mere tenants of the state (by declaring all productive land a national asset under state control) and, on the other hand, “placing a ceiling on how much land individual farmers can own.” Which, in practice, limits economies of scale, and with them successful commercial agriculture. “One farmer, one farm” was how Zimbabwe’s Zanu-PF thugs described this policy.

hat-tip Scott of the Pacific