Has identity politics shattered Martin Luther King’s dream?

Has identity politics shattered Martin Luther King’s dream? By Arthur Chrenkoff.

Martin Luther King Jr … was a plagiarist, a serial adulterer, and, at most charitable, a flirt with communism and far-left politics. He was also a man of a truly powerful word — and the Word — as well as of courage, a great moral leader of the century, a beacon lighting up both the injustices suffered by his people in the land of the free and at the same time showing his people the way to the Promised Land.

Today, like the Man-God in whose steps he followed and whose Gospel he preached, Dr King is claimed by all.  …

He is a hero of the secular left who was staunchly pro-life and whose beautiful rhetoric is steeped in the language now completely alien to the progressive discourse.

“I have a dream that little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.” — MLK

How has his dream fared then, fifty-five years later?

On one level, it has been achieved. … On the red hills of Georgia the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners are able to sit together at the table of brotherhood. … Even in Alabama, little black boys and black girls are able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers. …

On another level, however, that dream, after a promising start, seems to be receding even further away. …

The new Democratic Party, which eventually ditched its Bull Connors and George Wallaces, the left more broadly, the African-American leadership, the civil rights establishment are all increasingly beholden to the false prophecy of identity politics; the neo-Marxist vision that sees people not as individuals but as members of a group, and judges them by the color of their skin and not the content of their character. …

Sadly, by a twisted logic, those who like him try to preach colour-blindness are now more often than not called out as racists, or at best naive.

hat-tip Stephen Neil