Voters Show Massive Support for Trump Immigration Policies

Voters Show Massive Support for Trump Immigration Policies, by Neil Munro.

A poll of likely 2018 voters shows two-to-one support for President Donald Trump’s pro-American immigration policies, and a lopsided four-to-one opposition against the cheap-labor, mass-immigration, economic policy pushed by bipartisan establishment-backed D.C. interest-groups. …

The poll also showed that Hispanics are the most hostile to any increase in wage-lowering immigration — perhaps because Hispanics are most familiar with the wage-cutting impact of new arrivals. …

The results from the priorities poll are very different from the “Nation of Immigrants” polls pushed by business and progressive outlets. Business groups and Democrats tout the misleading, industry-funded “Nation of Immigrants” polls because they pressure Americans to say they welcome migrants, including the roughly 700,000 ‘DACA’ illegals and the roughly 3 million ‘dreamer’ illegals. …

Economic reasons for why immigration is so unpopular:

The Washington-imposed economic policy of economic growth via mass-immigration floods the market with foreign labor, spikes profits and Wall Street values by cutting salaries for manual and skilled labor offered by blue-collar and white-collar employees. It also drives up real estate prices, widens wealth-gaps, reduces high-tech investment, increases state and local tax burdens, hurts kids’ schools and college education, pushes Americans away from high-tech careers, and sidelines at least 5 million marginalized Americans and their families, including many who are now struggling with opioid addictions.

The cheap-labor policy has also reduced investment and job creation in many interior states because the coastal cities have a surplus of imported labor. For example, almost 27 percent of zip codes in Missouri had fewer jobs or businesses in 2015 than in 2000, according to a new report by the Economic Innovation Group. In Kansas, almost 29 percent of zip codes had fewer jobs and businesses in 2015 compared to 2000, which was a two-decade period of massive cheap-labor immigration.

Because of the successful cheap-labor strategy, wages for men have remained flat since 1973, and a large percentage of the nation’s annual income has shifted to investors and away from employees.

Ann Coulter may be right, that no other issue comes close to immigration at the moment.