“I’m Not Racist”

“I’m Not Racist”, by Spencer Quinn.

One of the more arresting things coming out of the hip hop world just these past few days is a video from black rapper Joyner Lucas. It’s called “I’m Not Racist” and, since its November 28 release, it has gone viral, racking up tens of millions of views on Facebook and millions more on YouTube. …

The scene takes place in a warehouse in which a stereotypical white and a stereotypical black engage in a nasty, profanity-ridden dialogue. In the first half of the song, the white chews out the black. And in the second half of the song, the black chews out the white. The white guy comes equipped with his workman jeans, rolled-up sleeves, and MAGA hat. He’s bearded and tubby and looks like he grew up on a steady diet of country music and classic rock, and has a copious supply of beer in the fridge in his garage right next to the car he’s always working on. The brother, on the other hand, is very dark-skinned and has the bling, the dreds, the sporting jersey, and the all the attitude one would expect from a person who chooses to look like that. …

Lucas did not intend to hold back. Indeed, he puts into the mouth of his white interlocutor many of things I’ve been wanting to say to black people for over twenty years, but with more rhyme and syncopation and fewer references to The Bell Curve. And all those glorious F-bombs and N-bombs? Yeah, about that much. …

What we have here is something pretty rare in our mainstream society these days. This isn’t a gentle tut-tut about the behavior of black people. Nor is it sanitized newscaster criticism of their misbehavior. Nor is it tough love, the kind dished out so often by what I call the Jock Right.

No, no. This is something else entirely. This is what we call contempt. And it’s real. Seriously, how often in our mainstream society do we see such bald, ugly, and candid contempt for what blacks do to themselves and everyone else unlucky enough to be around them? …

The black perspective in this song is, quite frankly, weak and unconvincing. It’s full of self-pity and childish anger, signifying nothing. …

Whites and people of other races have endured far worse than what American blacks have in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, and have rarely if ever resorted to the kind of stupid and savage behavior you find in black neighborhoods, cities, and countries every day. Is Joyner really trying to make lack of sympathy into an excuse for this sort of thing?

Towards the end of his diatribe, the black guy says one thing surprising, one thing that is both interesting and revealing: “I love you, but I fuckin’ hate you at the same time!” I can buy that. It reveals the utter irrationality of the black position in this debate. I’m sure a spoiled child getting spanked after a violent outburst feels the same way towards his parents or his “good” older sibling. It’s what happens when you put anger, envy, immaturity, and poor impulse control in a single package.

Perhaps some of these people deserve sympathy, but not when they so viciously blame their greatest benefactors for their own faults and failings. And yes, even with slavery, whites are the best friends blacks ever had. By any objective measure, we have treated them better than they have treated themselves. …

“I’m Not Racist” is the first widely-heard rap song that I am aware of that honestly deals with racial problems in America. I call it honest because it places an unfiltered white perspective alongside the black one, which rarely gets air time, and when it does, is usually filtered. And after hearing the song and viewing the video, I think I can see why that unfiltered white perspective appears so rarely in our mainstream culture. When placed alongside the black one, the white perspective will always overpower it. It contains too much truth not to do so. The white perspective, in effect, offers evidence of black intellectual and moral inferiority, while the black perspective can only offer theories to explain why he has no evidence with which to rebut the white perspective. All he has is violence and anger, which, as Confucius say, loses the argument.

Lots more strong commentary at the link.