How our teachers score top Marx

How our teachers score top Marx, by Bella d’Abrera.

At the end of last week, the Victorian Association for the Teaching of English convened in Melbourne for its annual conference …

The purpose of the conference … was to launch a program of social justice, featuring keynote speakers such as Van Badham, a left-wing activist and self -proclaimed communist, Shen Narayansamay, Human Rights Campaign Director at GetUp!, Van T Rudd, a visual artist who creates murals for ‘radical trade unions and various social justice movements’ and Gillian Triggs, former Present of the Australian Human Rights Commission.

And it cost us $70,000. …

Their collective, self-proclaimed task, as they see it, is to ‘disrupt, challenge, experiment, innovate’ in Victorian classrooms. …

For example, the first speaker on day one discussed how ‘climate change, poverty and migration’ would necessitate the transformation of both teaching and learning. Following this, attendees were able to participate in a workshop to explore strategies for ‘engaging with and empowering students to speak on issues of class, gender and race’ in the context of the novel The Outsiders. …

Day Two began with a panel discussion on the dangers of fake news, and which skills and attributes will best allow students to become ‘informed active citizens’. Other workshops offered advice on how to approach ‘migration, racism and identity’ as themes in the classroom, as well as a session which introduced teachers to the key concepts of the ‘Respectful Relationship Program’ the state government’s thinly disguised social engineering program of gender theory. …

It is apparent from the conference program that Victorian school children are being politicised in the classroom through the language of Identity politics –- the contemporary version of Orwell’s newspeak –- at the tax payer’s expense.

Long term, this is a huge problem for society because they are brainwashing our kids. We need a school voucher system, to get their hands off our kids.

hat-tip Stephen Neil