Amid sex scandals, Hollywood releases gay ‘romance’ that normalizes man-boy sex

Amid sex scandals, Hollywood releases gay ‘romance’ that normalizes man-boy sex, by Doug Mainwaring.

Call Me by Your Name,” which opened nationwide Thanksgiving weekend, is about an older man’s affair with a 17-year-old boy.  And while the movie is garnering rave reviews from urbane elites, their acclamations about the storyline are not quite accurate.

This is not a romantic tale about the awakening of homosexual desire in and between two men: It is a story about a man and boy whose relationship sparks homoeroticism and flirtation, which then turns romantic and carnal.

Summed up in a single word, the movie is about pederasty.

A secondary message is the suggestion that handsome, together, “straight” men and boys can be seduced and recruited.

The film has received high praise from leftist establishments.

Call Me By Your Name Just Officially Became This Year’s Oscars Frontrunner,” trumpets a W Magazine headline. Rolling Stone declares it “the most romantic movie of the year” and “an instant classic.” The New Yorker calls it an “erotic triumph, emotionally acute and overwhelmingly sensual,” and it is hailed by Entertainment Weekly as “gorgeous and intoxicating.”

Even National Review, way back in early October, called the movie “a charming gay romance” which “will probably mop up” at the Oscars.

The stunning hypocrisy of the left is revealed in its promotion of this movie as an “Oscar contender,” at a point in history where real-life Hollywood celebrities, Washington VIP politicos and other powerful men find their careers lying in ruins — or on the verge of ruin — for precisely the type of behavior this movie glorifies.

Recriminations from recent alleged sexually inappropriate behavior, or tales sexual indiscretions exhumed from long ago, have resulted in a huge public outcry against men in positions of power who opportunistically seek to satiate illicit sexual cravings. …

This movie seeks to mainstream pederasty (not to be confused with pedophilia) in a warm and fuzzy way. And after first being released on the big screen, its message will find its way onto home TV’s, laptop computers, and yes, onto the tablets and smartphones of adolescent children. It is not explicit pornography, but it is overt propaganda. …

Perhaps the most problematic component of the movie is that seventeen-year-old Elio’s father expresses his approval for his son’s sexual relationship with an older man. He laments with regret having forgone similar opportunities when he was his son’s age. …

The strategy:

To understand the strategy which propelled this movie into being, look back to the publication of After the Ball, a 1989 manifesto which presented a comprehensive plan to establish the normalcy of gays and lesbians and to secure broader acceptance and rights. It was followed “to a tee” and it worked. Here are two main elements of the strategy:

“We have in mind a strategy … calculated and powerful … manipulative … It’s time to learn from Madison Avenue, to roll out the big guns. Gays must launch a large-scale campaign — we’ve called it the waging peace campaign — to reach straights through the mainstream media. We’re talking about propaganda …”

“You can forget about trying right up front to persuade folks that homosexuality is a good thing. But if you can get them to think it is just another thing — meriting no more than a shrug of the shoulders — then your battle for legal and social rights is virtually won.”

After scoring win after win in courts across the nation, culminating in the United States Supreme Court’s landmark same-sex marriage Obergefell decision in 2015, the progressive left has moved on to its remaining frontiers: transgenderism and adult/child sexual relationships. Hollywood is now applying the same “After the Ball” strategies which worked so well regarding the mainlining of homosexuality.

First pederasty will be normalized, then pedophilia. And it will come about in the same way that the complete acceptance of homosexuality came about during our lifetimes: By talking about it relentlessly in media and portraying it so frequently in movies and on TV as a good thing that it becomes not only commonplace, it becomes boring.

hat-tip Stephen Neil