I established a terror movement in Australia, and I quit

I established a terror movement in Australia, and I quit, by Corrine Barraclough. Shayne Hunter established the far-left and violent Antifa movement in Australia. After four years the Brisbane man quit. Here’s why, in his own words.

ANTIFA is a growing extreme group who believe violence is legitimate.

I got radicalised in Sydney. I was originally concerned about Western intervention in Syria. Radical left wing people dominated rallies and I started to associate with them more. My so-called ‘normal’ friends drifted away. …

I came to believe that war was a symptom of bigger systems at play in society and they were the real enemy, like white supremacy and patriarchy. Antifa believe these systems need to be smashed through a process of ‘de-platforming’ to save the world. People who don’t necessarily agree on everything are united to attack their common enemy — anyone in the right wing of politics.

This micro-society became my life for four years.

They believe historically their roots were fighting Nazi oppression. They run a website which is updated every couple of weeks with a hit list of right wing names. They believe if these people are allowed to speak, society will suffer. So, they must be pushed back.

There is no mission statement, rather, it’s a dangerous rhetoric. There are a lot of very damaged people who are drawn to it. …

I read that Antifa in the US is training people to shoot and punch. It’s the same here. Antifa in Sydney are doing martial arts to, as they would put it, ‘fight the Nazis’. It’s a paramilitary mindset. …

I was ideologically possessed for four years. I would speak louder on public transport so people could hear me speak, hoping they would hear my message. …

The radical left of Antifa presents itself as being about compassion and empathy; it’s a Trojan horse. All conversations are about entitlement and rights, not responsibility. When these people talk about freedom, they really mean freedom from responsibility. …

You don’t know humiliation until you’ve left a cult; I wasted four years of my life.

I cut ties over time. I’m still in contact with some ex-cult members but I don’t see anyone who’s still active.

In my 20-something generation, social media plays the role of a 24/7 preacher — like a pocket preacher. Each day you’re being validated by the echo chamber on your phone.

hat-tip Scott of the Pacific