Insults, Activism and Aborigines

Insults, Activism and Aborigines, by Anthony Dillon.

Thankfully, only a minority of ‘activists’ (both black and white) have made it a life goal to promote hate between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians, but they are sufficient in number to impair race relations. Sadly, the greatest impact is on Aborigines. These activists (“whinja ninjas”, as I like to call them) are card-carrying members of the victim brigade …

Now consider what must be one of the most deplorable examples of promoting racial hate: a campaign aimed at encouraging the exposure of “police harassment” by a group calling themselves the National Justice Project (NJP). I have no problem with such a program — no problem, I should add, in principle. NJP is hoping to raise $40,000. …

If those behind the NJP were serious they would promote the following message: “Right now Aboriginal people in Australia are being harassed, beaten, raped, and killed by other Aboriginal people.” Given the well documented levels of violence in Aboriginal communities, this is where we should be focusing attention. …

Consider what ‘Darumbul woman’ and journalist Amy McQuire has to say in an article spruiking NJP’s appeal for donations. “It’s important that we begin to document all the interactions with police,” she says, “we can use this as evidence in court.” I certainly agree with the first part of Amy’s rant – document all interactions. But I think she might be in for big shock to find that, were she ever to express the number of problematic interactions between Aboriginal and non-Aborigines as a percentage of all such interactions it would be a very small percentage. …

Imagine being a police officer or a hospital staffer. Imagine being spat upon, kicked, sworn at, cursed, or threatened. Although only a minority of Aborigines engage in such behaviour, if it happens enough times then coloured perceptions will be inevitable. Sad undoubtedly, but such is human nature — and NJP’s attitude and campaign can only throw more fuel on the fires of stereotype and preconception.

Again, view the world through the lens of Amy McQuire, who writes, “For Aboriginal people, we see them [police] as the aggravators … as the people that you need protection from.” I can’t help but note a bit of stereotyping in that statement. The next time an Aboriginal woman is being battered by her partner the victim should consider contacting Ms McQuire, rather than the police, for help and protection and we’ll see how that works out.

hat-tip Stephen Neil