Sydney University adopts law courses pushing for recognition of sharia law, polygamy and young marriage in Australian legal system

Sydney University adopts law courses pushing for recognition of sharia law, polygamy and young marriage in Australian legal system, by Jack Houghton.

One of the Sydney University courses, “Muslim Minorities And The Law,” is taught by Salim Farrar and Dr Ghena Krayem and it uses a book the pair wrote as “the monograph upon which the unit of study bases its teaching”.

The Daily Telegraph can reveal the book claims “sharia and common law are not inherently incompatible” and that police’s failures to accommodate Islamic religious identity during operations was hampering the fight against Islamist terrorism.

Dr Ghena Krayem’s picture:

Dr Krayem and a team of Melbourne academics were awarded a federal government research grant in 2015 to research the Response Of Australian Family Law To Islamic Community Processes, to influence “future policy developments”.

Simon Kent:

“[Sharia and common law] are both ‘law’ in the sense they represent and communicate a set of ‘norms’ that operate at both individual and a community level,” the book explains. A portion of the textbook identifies the benefits of ending monogamous relationships and notes how sharia law does not recognise the minimum age in marriage.

“There is no minimum age for a contract of marriage, but it should not be consummated if that would cause harm to the putative spouse,” the book reads. “Whilst some have argued that there may be reasons for changing marriage laws to include polygamous marriages… there have not been any proposals for any legislative amendment proposed by the Muslim communities in our Common Law jurisdictions.”

As to the need for Western society to accommodate traditional Islamic views on a host of issues, the textbook pleads for special treatment for Muslims before the courts.

hat-tip Charles