Trump is dialing back his economic promises. Bigly

Trump is dialing back his economic promises. Bigly. By Heather Long.

Trump played up his image as a businessman and dealmaker who could rescue the U.S. economy. The day he was sworn in, he vowed to create 25 million new jobs — the most of any president in history — and double the growth of the Obama era (among other promises).

Wall Street has roared in anticipation, with the stock market hitting new heights. Over on Main Street, small business and consumer confidence hit multi-decade highs.

Now, reality is setting in for how much Trump can really get done (and how fast) on the economy.

The big tax reform that was supposed to be done by August? Don’t bet on it. White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer put it this way: “It still would be a great opportunity before they leave for August recess, but we’re going to make sure we do this right.”

Trump’s campaign promise to greatly reduce — or even eliminate — America’s federal debt? “That was hyperbole,” White House budget director Mick Mulvaney told CNBC Wednesday. “I’m not going to be able to pay off $20 trillion worth of debt in four years.” …

Repealing Obamacare and replacing it with something “something terrific”? That’s up in the air. …

Spending $1 trillion on infrastructure? That’s unlikely. Mulvaney said he and top economic adviser Gary Cohn are “assuming a $200 billion number.” …

“The 30 Freedom Caucus members in the House have sent a chill through the Trump inner circle. It’s clear they can block much of the Trump agenda, and Democrats seem lukewarm, at best, about cooperating,” says Greg Valliere, chief strategist at Horizon Investments. “So Trump has to lower expectations.”