New puritanism at work in refusals to show film The Red Pill

New puritanism at work in refusals to show film The Red Pill, by Janet Albrechtsen.

Increasingly, the university campus — the very place where young minds should be challenged and provoked, where preconceptions should be tested and the notion of intellectual comfort zones should be anathema — is becoming a symbol of the dismal future of liberal traditions. …

Last week the University of Sydney Union board withdrew funding to show a documentary called The Red Pill. Young filmmaker Cassie Jaye was researching rape culture when she came upon a website for men’s rights activists. The feminist, who had previously reported on issues such as single motherhood, LGBTI rights and marriage equality, had her own preconceptions challenged. The result is a thought-provoking exploration of issues that confront men, from ­unequal custody outcomes to male suicide rates, from male deaths in the workplace to inequalities in the criminal justice system, from dismal health statistics affecting men and more. …

The most compelling parts of The Red Pill are Jaye’s video diaries where the filmmaker thrashes through the strictures of her own feminist training. Here on film is the opening of a young feminist mind — precisely what most frightens the feminist ideologues and the cultural Marxists. Having lost control of the economic ­debates, the left’s shift into the cultural sphere has been underway for more than four decades. Daily assaults on basic freedoms, such as the freedom to speak, attest to their domination of this sphere.

Parroting the dogma of feminist academics who admit they haven’t seen The Red Pill, the USU board justified its decision by ­arguing the film promotes “sexual violence”. No one who has seen the film could make such a ridiculously dishonest claim. The film does no such thing. It explores ­issues affecting men.

Today’s cultural dietitians seek to control debates by slapping a nasty label on those with different views, repeating it over and over again, regardless of whether it fits. The aim of using vile labels is to strip opponents of credibility and, even better, censor their views. …

I’m ashamed to say that before seeing The Red Pill, I wondered whether the documentary was ­really one for me. But as the ­mother of a teenage boy on the cusp of manhood, I should have been more curious. This is a brilliant documentary that touches on so many issues that may one day confront our sons. …

The Red Pill, with the help of an organisation called Fan Force, will be screened across Australia if enough people sign up on its website to see it.

Red Pill film: feminist protests black out cinemas, by Tessa Akerman.

A Sydney cinema has become the latest venue to cancel a screening of men’s rights film The Red Pill, which has been the subject of feminist activist protests since it was released.

Dendy Cinema Newtown in Sydney’s inner west canned a sold-out screening of the film next week. The screening was organised by FanForce which was last week told their planned showing was cancelled.

FanForce is understood to be disappointed with the cancellation and despite multiple attempts to contact Dendy by The Australian, the cinema did not return calls or emails. …

The campaign being waged against cinemas’ rights to show this documentary in private screenings echoes the bullying campaign to boycott Coopers following their online video of a discussion on same-sex marriage.

hat-tip Stephen Neil