The left ‘s complete hypocrisy on race

The left ‘s complete hypocrisy on race, from Peter Rees. Imagine the following (it’s not real):

A DNA test showed I’m 100% white. Many thought there were none of us left, by Pauline Hanson.

A parliamentary portrait of Pauline Hanson early in her political career

“Mum! You didn’t tell me you’re 100% white!” My daughter stormed my room this morning brimming with pride, “I just read it on the internet!”

I only hoped I’d be at least 80%  white. Some laughed and thought I was being over confident. The pressure was on. The results could have gone either way. So, you can only imagine my relief and surprise when I was told, “You’re 98% White”

Yet, there’s so much attention on the White Affairs presenter being a full-blooded white. As Whites, we rely on passing down our ancestry from one generation to the next. This is how we identify ourselves. While I’m delightfully surprised with the result, I really don’t view myself as being more White than anyone else.

For me, being White is a way of life. I was born and bred in a White world where language and traditions were embedded in us. I received a white language education. I’m a proud White woman.

We’ve all been trained by the media to view this as appallingly racist, right? So check out this article in the Guardian:

A DNA test showed I’m 100% Maori. Many thought there were none of us left, by Oriini Kaipara.

Picture from Twitter

“Mum! You didn’t tell me you’re 100% Maori!” My daughter Te Aomihia stormed my room this morning brimming with pride, “I just read it on the internet!” …

I only hoped I’d be at least 80% Maori. Some laughed and thought I was being over confident. … The pressure was on. The results could have gone either way. So, you can only imagine my relief and surprise when I was told, “You’re 98% Maori.” …

Yet, there’s so much attention on the Native Affairs presenter being a full-blooded Māori. … As Maori, we rely on passing down our ancestry or whakapapa from one generation to the next. This is how we identify ourselves. … While I’m delightfully surprised with the result, I really don’t view myself as being more Maori than anyone else. …

For me, being Maori is a way of life. I was born and bred in a Maori world where reo (language) and tikanga (traditions) were embedded in us. I received Maori-language medium education. I’m a proud Tuhoe, Ngati Awa, Tuwharetoa and Te Arawa woman.

QED