Islam-critical Kirralie Smith seen as potential Australian libertarian leader

Islam-critical Kirralie Smith seen as potential Australian libertarian leader, by Nick O’Malley.

Smith received relatively little attention during the last federal election as a NSW Senate candidate for the Australian Liberty Alliance, the political offshoot of the Q Society, which describes itself as “Australia’s leading Islam-critical movement”.

(“Q Society supports an integrated multi-ethnic Australia and rejects racism … Since Islam is not a race or ethnicity, being critical of Islam is not racist,” its website explains.)

But she is likely to receive far more press in the coming weeks as the co-defendant in a defamation action being brought by the businessman Mohammed El-Mouelhy, who was the subject of a critical video produced by the Q Society and presented by Smith. …

A recent video of Kirralie Smith

She rejects the suggestion she is right wing, rather, she says she a part of the silent majority of mainstream conservatives whose voices are now being heard due to victories of Donald Trump and the Brexit campaign.

Smith says she does not believe there is an imminent threat of adopting Sharia law, but is concerned about what she calls “creeping sharia”.

“We are being encouraged very strongly to tolerate sharia finance, halal certification, the hijab,” she says. “Sharia is definitely present in Australia … I believe there are honour killings and it is all reported under domestic violence or another name,” she says. As evidence she says  she has close friends who are pastors who work in churches who have provided sanctuary to victims. …

Potential leader for a new Australian conservative movement:

During the US election she was horrified by Hillary Clinton’s support for abortion rights. She opposes political correctness, Safe Schools and big government regulations imposed upon farmers by distant bureaucrats.

“I pretty much oppose everything the Greens stand for,” she says.

She was also appalled by the Liberal Party’s abandonment of Tony Abbott for Malcolm Turnbull.

This broader political outlook, and Smith’s articulate direct manner, has led some observers to speculate that she is a potential leader for a new conservative movement, one energised by the international populist surge.

She is, says John Adams, a former Coalition adviser who has written about the need for more intellectual depth in the new conservative movement, a more capable and charismatic messenger than, say, Pauline Hanson. (“I think Pauline has a lot of good sentiment, I am not sure about the ability,” says Smith of Hanson.)

hat-tip Stephen Neil