How can we help thickos at university? Pretend they’re clever. Students emerge with useless degrees and not the remotest prospect of employment.

How can we help thickos at university? Pretend they’re clever. Students emerge with useless degrees and not the remotest prospect of employment. By Rod Liddle. From the UK, where the rot is slightly more advanced.

A lecturer at a reasonably well-respected northern plate-glass university was somewhat perplexed by a student who complained about her poor marks for an essay. She had a statement of Special Educational Needs. She insisted that this had not been taken into account in the marking of her paper. My acquaintance was hauled before the university authorities to explain why he had marked her so low. ‘Because it was awful work, the work of a cretin,’ he replied. Ah, perhaps, they told him. But you haven’t taken into account the fact that she has Special Educational Needs. That’s why the paper was awful. So you need to allow for that fact and mark it as if it had been better.

That is, the exasperated lecturer told me, as if it had been written by someone who wasn’t thick. We have to pretend.

So university entrance and even marks are now meaningless as a sorting mechanism, and employers have to administer their own tests.

This is delusional. We are not all equal, no matter how much and how often the liberals insist that we are. It is patently not the case. We are back with that squiggly line which liberals are happy to describe as a ‘circle’ because they are nice, inclusive people who believe that if a squiggly line wants to be a circle then it has every right to be one. It is an epic misapprehension and leads to absurdities such as the one I quote above, where someone who is useless at academic work has the right to be marked as if she were good at academic work, because it’s not her fault that she has the IQ of a block of Cathedral City cheddar cheese. In the end, this does nobody any favours.

You cannot cheat nature by dressing up, even if the lefties say you can:

The same fallacy underpins the insistence that everyone has the right to go to university, no matter how dense they might be. And so we now have legions of young people with third-class degrees in gender or urban studies from what were once noble polytechnics, cowering under a mountain of debt and with not the remotest prospect of finding work. Young people who expected to find highly remunerative and agreeable work because they have been to a ‘university’ and are therefore ‘clever’. But an awful lot of them are not clever in an academic sense at all, and would have been much better served by an apprenticeship, an NVQ, or work at the shop floor.