Criminalizing the opposition: Government says wearing “Don’t Tread on Me” insignia might be unlawful racial harassment

Criminalizing the opposition: Government says wearing “Don’t Tread on Me” insignia might be unlawful racial harassment, by Paul Mirengoff.

dont-tread-on-me

[W]hen an employee of a private company wore a cap with the “Don’t Tread on Me” insignia to work, a co-worker complained to the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) that wearing the cap constituted racial harassment on the part of the employer, which apparently did not ban it. The employee said he found the cap to be racially offensive to African Americans because the flag containing the slogan was designed by Christopher Gadsden, a “slave trader & owner of slaves.” …

Instead of summarily dismissing this complaint, the EEOC concluded “in light of the ambiguity in the current meaning of this symbol, we find that Complainant’s claim must be investigated to determine the specific context in which [the hat wearer] displayed the symbol in the workplace.”

So there you go, courtesy of the US bureaucracy. Ours will follow soon. Is everything non-PC to be “hate speech,” and a jailable or sackable offense?

The argument is laughable. Muslims have shouted passages from the Koran while killing Americans. Does this mean that if someone complains about a Muslim carrying the Koran to work the EEOC will investigate “the context” in which [he] carries the Koran?

No it does not. The EEOC isn’t articulating a theory of workplace harassment; it is cracking down on conservative political speech.

Everyone understands that “Don’t tread on me” is an anti-government slogan.

The next US President will select several Supreme Court judges, who will effectively make much of US social policy for the next couple of decades. Australia tends to follow.