Claudio Grass Talks to Godfrey Bloom

Claudio Grass Talks to Godfrey Bloom. Before becoming a politician, Godfrey Bloom worked for 35 years in finance and investment management. Bloom started as a representative for the UK Independence Party until 2013, then continues as an independent MEP.

I voted to join what I thought was a free trade zone in 1975; indeed it was called “the Common Market” on the ballot paper. It now transpires that a federal superstate was the ultimate goal. We were warned of this by some politicians at the time, but neither I, nor most of the public took heed.

Back in the seventies, we still vaguely believed our politicians told the truth. We had faith in our Prime Ministers, even though that might sound a bit naive today. It is also worth remembering Great Britain back then was at a low point in its historical trajectory, the lowest since the thirties and we were desperate.

Self-government has been salami-sliced away year by year. Neither the press nor media ever covered this aspect of the EU and its voracious central-planning ambitions. Public sector news broadcasting has been totally corrupted. It is still corrupt and biased even in the coverage of the referendum campaign. It goes to show, the establishment has a grip of steel over every aspect of our lives. …

The thing that has always irritated me most over the last thirty years is the dishonest refusal of the British establishment to come clean about the truth of the European project. If you believe in a superstate for the good of Europe and mankind, then speak up and clearly say so, and be proud. ….

Would you believe the principles of English law are not taught in schools today; not even our system of government, or the English Bill of Rights. It is so easy to steal from people something that they did not know they had in the first place.

The socialist economic calculation problem limits the size of government, but the PC and big-government types scarcely even understand it.

What do we expect from the State and what can it deliver? This debate has never been had and is long overdue.

It seems the State sees itself as the ultimate champion of the consumer. Therefore, it demands a remit of almost absolute power. This, in addition to corporate and social welfarism, means that we are now ruled by the most intrusive governments in history.

This system is doomed to inevitable failure: Ultimately, only the market can protect the citizen. Not only are there not enough resources for the State to take over this role, but also, as every Austrian economist knows, regulation is impossible without perfect knowledge of the market.

Only civil servants and politicians could be arrogant enough to believe they can control and steer the economy at will; paradoxically, the same two groups of people with no knowledge of markets by definition. …

It has been known since 1920 that sensible economic calculation is literally impossible for governments and central planners…a fact that has been studiously ignored by self-anointed social engineers ever since, even in the face of overwhelming evidence.

Self interest by the bureaucrats ensures they never understand, which is why they and whatever they govern are doomed to economic stagnation.