How we lost the plot on immigration: As a one-legged Albanian drug dealing murderer gets citizenship, benefits and a home, two utterly decent and hardworking families face being expelled

How we lost the plot on immigration: As a one-legged Albanian drug dealing murderer gets citizenship, benefits and a home, two utterly decent and hardworking families face being expelled, by Richard Kay.

For after eight happy and hard-working years in Scotland where they have put down roots, the Zielsdorfs and their children are being thrown out of the country.

Any day now — despite having invested more than £200,000 in a business which they have turned into the thriving hub of community life in Laggan, the beautiful village where the BBC series Monarch of the Glen was set, their lives are poised to be turned upside down.

Their crime? They could only afford to employ one full-time member of staff in their cafe, rather than two — a pernickety detail, you might think, but to the Home Office, it is all the justification they need.

So in February the Zielsdorfs were given their marching orders and told they had four months to prove they were not in breach of criteria for a business visa — or sell up and return to their native Canada.

Time is running out. Indeed, by tomorrow Mr Zielsdorf has to submit what Home Office staff casually describe as his ‘exit plan’ — in other words, proof he has purchased (one-way) air tickets.

He cannot. All his money is tied up in the business, which he cannot sell. In the meantime, he has had his driving licence cancelled and has been warned that his bank accounts may be frozen.

Meanwhile:

[I]n Westminster Magistrates’ Court, a one-legged Albanian double murderer has been granted legal aid to fight extradition from Britain, even though his wife says he confessed to the killings to her.

Saliman Barci — who now claims he is innocent — is using human rights law to avoid being deported to his homeland, where he has already been convicted of killing two men.

Although he posed as a Kosovan refugee to gain British citizenship, he was allowed to live rent-free in a £560-a-month, four-bedroom housing association home and enjoyed nearly £2,000 a month in benefits — all this while making a small fortune from selling cocaine in London.

It’s PC policies and bureaucracy at work. Supposing one wanted to change this, for whom does one vote?

hat-tip Stephen Neil