The betrayal of our boys: They’re falling behind girls in almost every way. And the feminisation of society, especially our schools, is to blame.

The betrayal of our boys: They’re falling behind girls in almost every way. And the feminisation of society, especially our schools, is to blame. By Sarah Vine, in the UK.

Boys are less likely to go to university. If they do get there, they are statistically much more likely to drop out. And all but the most high-flying have fewer job prospects when they leave. …

[G]irls have 35 per cent more chance of entering higher education … The poorer you are, the more dire the situation. Among pupils on free school meals, girls are 51 per cent more likely than boys to continue their studies after school.

And the group that fares worse than any other is low-income white boys. Just 8.9 per cent of them make it to college. It’s no coincidence that so many of this group are represented in our justice system, in young offender institutions and prisons. Young men from deprived backgrounds with very few opportunities to start off with, but whose options now seem narrower than ever.

The media go on and on about boys not doing as well as girls, how unfair it is, and how it must be rectified. Not. (You know the drill: imagine the outrage if the sexes were reversed.)

The facts don’t lie: young men are becoming increasingly disenfranchised within society. And that process begins precisely where it should be eradicated: at school.