Nearly 500 paper-pushers required to move US battalion from Baltic state to Germany

Nearly 500 paper-pushers required to move US battalion from Baltic state to Germany. In early 2015 an U.S. Army mechanized battalion made a very well publicized road march from Poland, Lithuania and Estonia back to its base in Germany, to demonstrate to the locals as well as the Russians that American armored units could reach the East European NATO nations by road, as well as by ship, aircraft or rail. “Dragoon Ride” purposely rode close to the Russian border, often in full view of Russians and Russian media. But oh the bureaucracy:

[The move] … required nearly 6,000 travel documents to be prepared, filed and approved to get foreign military vehicles across East European borders. Some of these documents take several weeks to get approved and operations like Dragoon Ride required hundreds of them and nearly as many NATO local government personnel were involved with this paperwork as were actually participating (500 troops) in the actual Dragoon Ride (of 120 vehicles). While all these rules and approvals would not stop invading Russians they would, in theory, slow down reinforces from the West.