New system instantly edits videos to make it look like you’re saying something you’re not

New system instantly edits videos to make it look like you’re saying something you’re not. Once photos were believed, because they were so difficult to fake — then came digital photography and Photoshop, and a dubious photo is presumed fake unless proven otherwise. Now video is about to undergo the same transformation.

The short version: take a YouTube video of someone speaking like, say, George W. Bush. Use a standard RGB webcam to capture a video of someone else emoting and saying something entirely different. Throw both videos into the Face2Face system and, bam, you’ve now got a relatively believable video of George W. Bush’s face — now almost entirely synthesized — doing whatever the actor in the second video wanted the target’s face to do. It even tries to work out what the interior of their mouth should look like as they’re speaking.

So watch out: there will be a rash videos of people apparently saying things they never said, real soon now.

On a personal note, it’s really annoying to appear on TV appearing to say something the opposite of what you said. The ABC did it to me over climate change, an issue they cannot bring themselves to report on honestly. Here’s the proof.